10-Year Plan High-Level Indicators Report for Fiscal Year 2010


High-level performance indicators have been identified to allow the measurement of overall progress in preventing and ending homelessness. Below are high-level indicators tables, including specific measures of progress, as framed at the end of Fiscal Year 2010 (July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011). Indicators may be refined in future years as data coming from the Homeless Management and Information System (HMIS) becomes more precise regarding the current population of homeless individuals and families and those who are at risk of becoming homeless in the Fairfax-Falls Church community, as well as the effectiveness of service delivery.

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Programs, Services and Housing Units  

Purpose / Goal

Indicator

Number

Outcome

Comments

Homelessness in Fairfax-Falls Church is ended: Every person who is homeless or at risk of becoming homeless in the Fairfax-Falls Church community is able to access appropriate, affordable housing and the services needed to keep them in their homes. 

1. The total number of homeless persons not in permanent housing decreases every year over the next 10 years, from 1,800 persons identified during the Point-in-Time count in 2007 to achieving the goal of ending homelessness in 2018.

1,544 people were literally homeless during the 2010 Point-in-Time count.

14.22% decrease since 2007.

10.75% decrease since 2009.

2. The number of chronically homeless persons not in permanent housing decreases every year over the next 10 years, from 372 persons identified in the Point-in-Time count in 2007 to the goal of ending homelessness in 2018.

242 people were chronically homeless during the 2010 Point-in-Time count.

34.95% decrease since 2007.

18.81% decrease since 2009.

3. The time that it takes a homeless person to access appropriate housing is 90 days or less for at least 90 percent of homeless persons by year 4 of Plan implementation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As written, this outcome cannot be measured at this time using the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS).

During Fiscal Year 2010, the average length of homelessness for those who entered permanent housing was 322 days. This included participants in transitional housing.   

 

This outcome and data will be reviewed and edited by the Interagency Work Group on HOST.  This outcome may be broken down into units that can be measured using HMIS, such as decreasing the average length of homelessness. It may also include factors such as increasing the percentage of homeless persons who enter permanent housing. The requirements set forth in the McKinney-Vento Legislation as amended by HEARTH should be considered while editing this indicator.

 

Components / Strategies

Indicator

Number

Outcome

Comments

1. The number of housing appropriate units in the Fairfax-Falls Church community made available to homeless person increases annually (all types of housing units).

 

 

1.1. Make available an additional 265 housing units every year to provide permanent housing for homeless persons.

The Housing Options Committee (a work group formally approved by the Governing Board of the Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness, as well as county leadership) has adopted this indicator as their goal for the number of new units that must be made available to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. 

The Housing Options Committee set the goal for the number of new units to be created at 124 for FISCAL YEAR 2010.

(For more information of the formal work of this committee, and its tie to the organizational structure of the Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness, please see 3.1.)

Due to the work of the Housing Options Committee 103 new units of permanent housing were made available to homeless persons.

 

 

 

83% of targeted units developed (103 of 124).

 

 

The number of new units of housing developed by the Housing Options Committee does not include all of the permanent housing units that were moved into in FISCAL YEAR 2010 by people who experienced homelessness. 

Many of the people who were able to end their homelessness moved into permanent housing units that were available in the private market.

HMIS is able to report the number of persons who exited to permanent housing and in the future will include the inventory of units in programs that provide units specifically for persons moving out of homelessness.

 

1.2. Community provides adequate financial resources to secure subsidy system to maintain homeless persons in permanent housing. 

 

$7.7 million allocated in FISCAL YEAR 2010.

No information.

This past fiscal year, $4 million was allocated to implement the Blueprint on Housing. In addition, over $3.7 million in financial assistance was allocated from state and local Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-housing (HPRP) funds and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families–Emergency Contingency Funds (TANF-ECF.)   

2. The HOST system is established to provide homeless persons and those at risk of homelessness with rapid assessment and support services to maintain existing housing or rapid permanent re-housing for homeless persons in appropriate housing units.

2.1. At least 90 percent of the at-risk households helped by prevention services do not enter the homeless population.

 

838 total people were served in HPRP during Fiscal Year 2010. Of those 838, 133 persons had exited by the last day of Fiscal Year 2010.   

96.2% of people who exited HPRP did not enter the homeless population.

 

 

Of the 838 participants in HPRP, 133 exited this year.  Of those 133, 128 were able to exit the program and maintain their housing with no additional support or services.

There are many other homelessness prevention programs in the community; however, their data is not recorded in HMIS and is not available for reporting at this time. 

2.2. Place 265 homeless households annually in appropriate housing units with needed support services.

 

 

 

No information.

No information.

All of the homeless shelters now offer community case management to people who are exiting the shelter to permanent housing. 

The number of households who exit homelessness into appropriate housing and then receive support services is not currently tracked in HMIS. Specific fields to track this information need to be defined.

2.3. At least 90 percent of homeless households placed in appropriate housing maintain such housing for at least one year. 

No information.

No information.

In order to determine whether 90% of households maintain their housing for at least one year, the households who moved into permanent housing had to be identified. This year was used to establish that 465 people exited homelessness into permanent housing.

In Fiscal Year 2011, the number of those who have remained in permanent housing for at least one year can be measured.  However, the method for collecting this data must be determined as many clients do not need nor do they continue to receive services for a full year. 

2.4. At least 90 percent of the homeless households placed in appropriate housing do not reenter the homeless population.

 

No information.

No information.

In order to determine whether 90% of households did not reenter the homeless population, it is necessary to determine what households exited the homeless population. This year was used to establish that 465 people exited homelessness into permanent housing. In FISCAL YEAR 2011, the number of those who reenter the homeless system can be measured. 

 

Management and Governance  

Component / Strategy

Indicator

Comments

3. Effective public / private governance and organizational structure established, operating and charged with managing the Fairfax-Falls Church effort to end homelessness.

3.1. By October 2008, the governance structure for the Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness has been established and is operating through a broad-based governing structure with recognized community, business, and faith community leaders, a centralized unit to manage and monitor Plan execution, coordination among all agencies involved, and input from homeless persons and families. 

The Governing Board and the Office to Prevent and End Homelessness are up and functioning.  The foundation and the Consumer Advisory Council are being formed at this time, and should be up and running in FISCAL YEAR 2012.

With the approval of the Governing Board of the Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness and county leadership, the Interagency Work Group has been split into two bodies, one that will address housing and the other that will focus on HOST services.  The newly renamed Housing Options Interagency Work Group (formerly the Housing Options Work Group) is already working, and is responsible for all of the Housing Targets included in the 10-Year Plan. The Interagency Work Group on HOST will be established in FISCAL YEAR 2012.

 

3.2. Annual review of the Plan’s high level indicators demonstrates that the Plan is achieving its incremental goals.

Year 2010 has been a critical year for the Plan success over time:

Basic organizational structure for Plan has been put in place (Consumer Advisory Council and Inter-Agency Council to be established in Fiscal Year 2011.)

Significant additional permanent housing provided to homeless population.

Initial HOST team system put into place in 4 regions of the Fairfax-Falls Church community.

HMIS system improved significantly in terms of quality and extensiveness of use.

Baseline data established for various indicators and system-wide information.

Some critical data for indicator reporting still needs to be developed in FISCAL YEAR 2011 and FISCAL YEAR 2012 for full reporting on indicators.

Partnership was able to provide a system wide report on the Plan for the first time (Snapshot).

 

3.3. There is increased participation of the Fairfax-Falls Church community in Plan implementation as reflected by greater participation in HOST, increasing housing units made available, and increased financial and volunteer resources.

 

 

Over the past year, the level of collaboration from the private, government, faith and nonprofit sectors has been greatly improved. Several county agencies and many nonprofits and houses of faith have provided services, participated in data collection, been active in work groups and otherwise committed to implementing HOST. In addition, the business community has hosted engagement events, supported donations and provided funding.  Through successful collaboration more housing units have been made available, solicitation for and receipt of financial resources has increased and awareness and volunteerism has increased (as seen through our Target event).

 

3.4. Fairfax- Falls Church community at large is knowledgeable of homelessness issues and supportive of the solutions adopted to end homelessness.

Partnership has instituted widespread education effort though the Partner Update e-newsletter, community forums and business engagement events. 

For more information on the high-level performance indicators, contact Tom Barnett, Fairfax County Office to Prevent and End Homelessness, at thomas.barnett@fairfaxcounty.gov.


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