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Historic Properties Rental Services


Cabell's Mill | Clark House | Dranesville Tavern | Great Falls Grange | Hunter House | Forestville Schoolhouse | Stone Mansion | Wakefield Chapel

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Visit our properties on-line and see why History Loves Company

From the rustic life at Dranesville Tavern to the life of the privileged class at Stone Mansion, the historic properties under the stewardship of the Fairfax County Park Authority, Resource Management Division offer a unique representation of early life in Fairfax County.

The facilities operated by Historic Properties Rental Services are suitable for all types of functions - weddings, receptions, parties and other social gatherings, as well as a variety of corporate meetings and events.

 

Cabell's Mill Cabell's Mill
Located in the wooded acres of Ellanor C. Lawrence Park, Cabell's Mill has long been a unique setting for social occasions. Built prior to 1800 and operated as a mill until 1916, the property was purchased in 1935 by Ellanor Lawrence. She and her husband, David, founder of US News & World Report, transformed the old mill into a guest house and hosted many Washington notables, including Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Read More >>

 

Clark House Clark House
This Victorian farmhouse was commissioned by William Clark in 1902, and is the surviving architectural remnant of a large dairy farm operated by the Clark family for over 50 years. Today, the Clark House has been restored to its original graceful exterior. Read More >>

 

Dranesville Tavern Dranesville Tavern
Built in 1824, Dranesville Tavern was one of five taverns located near the Dranesville Crossroads. It quickly found a steady flow of regular customers among many farmers and drovers moving grain and livestock from Leesburg and western Virginia to the ports of Alexandria and Georgetown. Read More >>

 

Great Falls Grange Great Falls Grange
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this public assembly hall was built in 1929, a product of the Grange Movement which swept rural America shortly after the Civil War. The Grange was built as a symbol of commitment to community involvement and progress, and has been a meeting and special event site throughout its history. Read More >>

 

Hunter House Hunter House
Built in 1890 by Scots immigrant John C. Hunter, Hunter House began as a small frame farmhouse. Over the years, the house was enlarged, but still retains much of its original character. After Prohibition, the house and surrounding grounds were bonded as Distillery No. 4, and produced "Virginia Maid" wine. Read More >>

 

Forestville Schoolhouse Forestville Schoolhouse
This site, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, dates back to 1889. It was originally a one-room schoolhouse, but in 1911 it doubled in size when the Floris Elementary Schoolhouse was moved from its location in what is now Frying Pan Park and attached to the west side of the building. Over the years, the schoolhouse has served as a school, junior Grange, library, bank, post office and private residence. Read More >>

 

Stone Mansion Stone Mansion
In 1780 Walter Brooke, a commodore of the Revolutionary War Navy of Virginia, friend of George Washington, and first cousin to George Mason, built a house just off the Kings Highway which he called "Retirement." That house is now known as Stone Mansion. A major renovation in the 1940s enlarged and modernized the house, added two wings, a stone facade, and an elegant two-story colonnaded front porch. Read More >>

 

Wakefield Chapel Wakefield Chapel
Wakefield Chapel was built in 1899 on land donated by local sawmill owner, Oliver Besley. The chapel was named for its first local preacher, the Reverend E. W. Wakefield, a colorful figure in Virginia Methodism and a Union Officer during the Civil War. The building served as a community church until 1951, and was later turned over to the Park Authority to be preserved for future generations. Read More >>

 

For additional information,

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