Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

Fairfax County, Virginia

 

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Emergency - 703-573-5679 Detox - 703-502-7000 (24/7)

703-383-8500 | TTY 711

8221 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive
Fairfax, Virginia 22031

Daryl Washington, Executive Director

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WHAT WE DO

The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board provides services for people of all ages who have mental illness, substance use disorders and/or developmental disabilities.

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Need emergency help?

Call 911 if immediately life-threatening and ask for Crisis Intervention trained officer.

Emergency mental health services 24/7
703-573-5679   TTY 711

Merrifield Center, Lower Level
If possible, before coming to the Merrifield Center, please call ahead to Emergency Services to see if you are able to be seen via telehealth services – phone or video.

Fairfax Detoxification Center 24/7
703-502-7000 
TTY 703-322-9080

Learn how CSB services have been adjusted during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Need information & services?

For other CSB services, call CSB Entry & Referral
703-383-8500   TTY 711
Mon. – Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

During this time, CSB has transitioned mainly to telehealth services via Zoom for Healthcare, by phone or video.

Learn how CSB services have been adjusted during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Learn more about our services...

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CSB News

Circular text - Global Peer Support Celebration Day - celebrating what's strong

October 15, 2020
The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board is proud to honor its team of Peer Support Specialists on Global Peer Support Celebration Day, Thursday, October 15. Peer supporters have lived experience with mental health challenges, substance use disorders, or both, are now in stable recovery, and are trained to help others on their own journey to recovery. Peer Support Specialist Jalna Harris Celebrates Global Peer Support! CSB’s Michael T. Lane, M.A. Ed., NCPS, CPRP, Director of Individual and Family Affairs, says, “Peer support changes lives. Sometimes that connection is just what someone needs to kindle a fire of hope, a willingness to take the next step toward wellness after long, dark years. The work is not easy. Mindfully sharing some really difficult parts of one’s personal journey and being with someone when they’re struggling, takes tremendous strength and courage.” Our CSB has approximately 40 Peer Support Specialists who: Provide one-on-one peer counseling. Share community resources for housing, employment and other basic needs. Share their experiences with recovery from mental health challenges and substance use disorders and co-occurring disorders. Facilitate peer support groups and training events. Provide hope and support when people are experiencing major life challenges. Both the Peer Support Specialist and the person receiving services receive benefits from these services. Jennifer Deneault, CPRS, Peer Support Specialist with CSB’s Peer Overdose Response Team (PORT) program, says, “Every person’s recovery is different. Helping people build sober supports, push through the difficult times, and get to their ‘aha moment’ is very rewarding.” Peer support relies on a nonhierarchical, reciprocal relationship that fosters understanding and trust between peer supporters and their peers, and among populations who otherwise may be alienated from or have poor access to mental health and or addiction services. Peer support is voluntary, but usually frequent and ongoing, and accessible, flexible, culturally sensitive, and peer focused. Peer support can take many forms – phone calls, text messaging, group meetings, home visits, going for walks together and even grocery shopping. It complements and enhances other mental health and addiction services by providing the emotional and social support and practical assistance necessary for people with mental health, addiction, or both to manage their disorders and stay healthy. Many of CSB’s Peer Support Specialists have earned Certified Peer Recovery Specialist (CPRS) status, which requires completing 72 hours of training and accumulating 500 hours of experience (learn more about the accreditation process). They work in service areas throughout the CSB, including: Emergency & Crisis Services (Woodburn Place Crisis Care, Emergency Services) Residential (Cornerstones, Crossroads, New Horizons, New Generations) Intensive Community Treatment Services (Intensive Case Management, Program for Assertive Community Treatment [PACT], Program to Assist in Transition from Homelessness [PATH]), Diversion & Jail-Based Services (Jail Diversion, Striving to Achieve Recovery [STAR] program), Behavioral Health Outpatient & Case Management Services (Gartlan Center, Medication-Assisted Treatment/Office-Based Opioid Treatment [MAT/OBOT]) Employment & Day Services (Turning Point) and the Office of Individual & Family Affairs (Peer Overdose Response Team [PORT]). Research shows that peer supporters have a transformative effect on the peers they serve, other mental health providers (therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists), and the mental health systems that employ them. “Peer support specialists provide life-changing support, insight, and resources that enable individuals to live healthy, thriving lives. The value of our Peer Support Specialists’ personal experiences is immeasurable," says Daryl Washington, Executive Director of the CSB. The benefits of peer support are tremendous. Lane says, “Knowing that someone has been in your shoes, has experienced very serious challenges that are similar to yours, and that they’re living a rich, fulfilling life – wow! What a difference!” Thank you, Peer Support Specialists!

Background photo of prescription bottles with Operation Medicine Cabinet Cleanout date Oct. 24

October 14, 2020
In conjunction with DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Initiative Take advantage of a free, convenient, confidential, and safe disposal of unused or expired medications during Operation Medicine Cabinet Cleanout on Saturday, October 24, 2020. Why drop off your unwanted medications? Drug take back programs are a safe method for disposing of prescription drugs and are organized and closely monitored by local, state, and federal government agencies. Safe disposal of unused or expired medications prevents drug abuse and misuse, accidental poisoning, and protects the environment. Saturday, October 24, 2020 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Drop off unused or expired medications at the locations listed below (Accepted items: prescription and non-prescription pills, e-cigarettes and vaping devices with batteries removed, small liquid packs/pods for e-cigarettes and vaping devices, prescription ointments, and medications for pets. Not accepted: illegal drugs, pressurized canisters [inhalers/aerosol cans], needles, large sources of liquids, non-prescription ointments and lotions.) Disposal is FREE, convenient, confidential, and safe Safe handling of unused or expired medications: Protects the environment Prevents drug misuse Prevents accidental poisoning Drop-Off Sites Fair Oaks District Station 12300 Lee Jackson Memorial Highway, Fairfax, VA 22033 Franconia District Station 6121 Franconia Road, Alexandria, VA 22310 Kings Park Library 9000 Burke Lake Road, Burke, VA 22015 Mason District Station 6507 Columbia Pike, Annandale, VA 22003 McLean District Station 1437 Balls Hill Road, McLean, VA 22101 Mount Vernon District Station 2511 Parkers Lane, Alexandria, VA 22306 Reston Hospital Center 1850 Town Center Parkway Reston, VA 20190 Outside Pavilion 1, across from Parking Garage B Sully District Station 4900 Stonecroft Boulevard, Chantilly, VA 20151 Need help with a substance abuse issue? Call the Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board: Emergency Services (24/7) – 703-573-5679 (TTY 711) Fairfax Detoxification Center (24/7) – 703-502-7000 (TTY 703-322-9080) CSB Entry & Referral Services – 703-383-8500 Call 911 for life-threatening emergencies Our community partners Operation Medicine Cabinet Cleanout is a partnership with the Rotary Clubs of Fairfax County, the Fairfax Prevention Coalition and local businesses, in collaboration with the following Fairfax County government departments:  Police, Health, Neighborhood and Community Services, Public Works and Environmental Services, and the Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board. Printable Operation Medicine Cabinet Cleanout flyers [Click on the image below for a printable flyer, or right-click to save the image]          Social media graphics [Click on the image below to save]

October wellness activities calendar

October 1, 2020
[Click the image for a printable calendar] The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board's Wellness, Health Promotion & Prevention team focuses on ways to strengthen our community’s emotional health and ability to handle challenges related to mental health concerns and substance misuse. In October, we recognize Mental Illness Awareness Week, National Depression Screening Day, World Health Day and Red Ribbon Week. Join us by taking part in individual and community-wide actions that you can take – virtually and from a safe distance – that promote resiliency, provide support to loved ones and stay connected. There are actions you can take to learn the warning signs for those experiencing a mental health concern and concrete steps to help promote safety in your family and community. Explore our calendar of suggestions and reach out to the prevention team for more information about the activities suggested. Suicide is preventable. Research shows that people who are having thoughts of suicide feel relief when someone asks them in a caring way. If you or someone you know is having a difficult time or having thoughts of suicide, reach out and find hope. Contact CrisisLink to speak with someone. Call 703-527-4077 or text "CONNECT" to 855-11 any time, 24/7. Calendar Resource Links Mental Health First Aid (contact us about virtual training sessions) Test your mood myStrength app: Click on ‘Sign Up’, and enter access code ‘CSBCommunity’ Lock & Talk safe firearm and medication storage and lockandtalk.org Learn how to dispose of medication safely Get a medication disposal bag CSB Prevention Team Adverse Childhood Experiences training REVIVE! opioid overdose reversal training Red Ribbon Week: www.redribbon.org Talk with your children about drug [Get a printable calendar.]

Logo for Direct Support Professional Recognition Week

September 16, 2020
September 13-19 is Direct Support Professional Recognition Week and CSB is celebrating our team of Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) who work with individuals who have intellectual or developmental disabilities.  Barbara Wadley-Young, Ph.D., MSW, Assistant Deputy Director, Community Living & Treatment Services, explains why DSPs are so important: “Our DSPs are invaluable safeguards of our agency responsibility to provide quality residential services to individuals with developmental disabilities. They always show up to work, around the clock and despite hurricanes, snow storms and now pandemics, to ensure that some of our most vulnerable service recipients are safe and receiving needed services.” Nakita Sanders, who joined CSB last year said, “I enjoy working as a DSP, because I can provide support to individuals who need it the most. I love helping our individuals become more independent and confident in their own abilities.” Many of the folks in residential programming came to the CSB following deinstitutionalization in the 1980s, going through many seasons of life together with the staff. Wadley-Young says “Many of the individuals we serve in our residential programs have been with the CSB for decades and they recognize and welcome DSPs as part of their family and friend support network.”  Enjoying the early fall weather on the deck at Midway group home are Logan (staff), Fred, Abigail (staff), Keston, Catherine (staff), and Heather. Abiodun Falowo, a 15-year DSP said, “This work has been a blessing for me. I wasn’t looking to stay this long. I have a bachelors and master’s degrees in information security, but this work has kept me level-headed and humble and there is joy in this work that money cannot buy.” Longtime DSPs are part of incredible progress for some of the individuals they work with. Falowo explained, “Over the years I have seen so much growth take place. One man was so attached to his parents that there were daily and sometime multiple phone calls to them for various reasons. Today he is comfortable in his home, can entertain himself, and is gainfully employed. His parents traveled outside of the country a year ago – that is something they did not feel comfortable doing several years ago because of their son’s anxieties.” Back in March, when everything began shutting down due to COVID-19, CSB knew the individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities would be in good hands. “The diligence that each DSP has shown to protect individuals from the spread of the virus, while also mitigating boredom while safely supporting gradual reengagement in community life has been absolutely invaluable,” said Wadley-Young. CarLa Bryant, Assistant Director of Assisted and Community Residential Services (ACRS), noted “Some of our DSPs had to arrange for unexpected childcare when the schools closed, some work other jobs and had to make decisions about their altered work schedules. We have been very fortunate to have so many of our staff show up consistently during the crisis.” Sherry Hassel, Program Coordinator for ACRS, adds, “Every shift was filled – overnights, holidays, everything – our staff have been outstanding throughout this pandemic.” The pandemic presented other important challenges for DSPs: the day programs that many individuals relied on also closed, leaving them with many more hours at home. DSPs have come up with a variety of creative activities to keep people engaged and to try to keep a sense of normalcy. There have been many new craft projects, lots of neighborhood walks, and outdoor picnics at local parks. Regular routines like family visits were also left in limbo. The DSP staff have worked hard to help keep individuals connected with their families, at first doing virtual visits using newly available webcams, and then setting up safe, socially distanced outdoor get-togethers. Even birthdays are being celebrated in new, fun ways. One group home hosted a small, socially distanced backyard birthday party for a resident, with a few family members attending, and then many more family and friends driving past in decorated cars to honk, cheer, and drop off gifts as the gentleman watched safely from the front porch. Parent Jessica Burmester said, “In this time of limited contact, isolating from the general community due to the pandemic, my son's group home staff have stepped up to ensure that all of his needs are met. He enjoys moving around his home, listening to music, and getting extra attention by staff. He is very happy and is well-cared for.” The requirement to become a DSP in the state of Virginia is to have at least a high school diploma and achieving the Orientation Competency training through Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services. DSPs also attend many required CSB-provided trainings and several recertifications over the span of working in this field. But Bryant notes that, “The true way to find a qualified DSP is to listen for the understanding that the men and women who we support are individuals who have talents, gifts and strengths, and just need support in getting to what they want in life. When we find those candidates, they become part of our team.”  The field is also changing. The position used to be one of solely caretaking of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, helping with daily living skills. Today, the primary role of DSPs is to be advocates and teach new skills with the goal of helping people with disabilities to be more independent. With the Department of Justice ruling for the field of Developmental Disabilities in Virginia came a variety of changes for how people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are to be supported. Born out of the DOJ settlement is a focus on ensuring that individuals are informed and understand their rights in many areas such as where to live, who to live with, privacy and day-to-day choices. Over the last twenty years, the role of DSPs has moved away from doing the work for individuals to encouraging and empowering individuals to make choices and decisions for themselves. Today, having a life like yours and mine is the goal for the men and women we support. Wadley-Young sums it up best: “For the CSB and the community, DSP staff are not just essential, they are superheroes. We could not be more appreciative of the compassion and commitment, at any time, and especially during this crisis.”

Calendar image

September 14, 2020
The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board's Wellness, Health Promotion & Prevention team focuses on ways to strengthen our community’s emotional health and ability to handle challenges related to mental health concerns and substance misuse. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Join us by taking part in individual and community-wide actions that you can take – virtually and from a safe distance – that promote resiliency, provide support to loved ones and stay connected. There are actions you can take to learn the warning signs for those experiencing a mental health concern and concrete steps to help promote safety in your family and community. Explore our calendar of suggestions and reach out to the prevention team for more information about the activities suggested. Suicide is preventable. Research shows that people who are having thoughts of suicide feel relief when someone asks them in a caring way. If you or someone you know is having a difficult time or having thoughts of suicide, reach out and find hope. Contact CrisisLink to speak with someone. Call 703-527-4077 or text "CONNECT" to 855-11 any time, 24/7. Calendar Resource Links CSB Prevention Team Test your mood Suicide warning signs pocket guide Recovery Program Solutions of Northern Virginia virtual support groups Suicide Prevention Alliance of Northern Virginia Kevin Hines: www.kevinhinesstory.com Learn how to dispose of medication safely myStrength app: Click on ‘Sign Up’, and enter access code ‘CSBCommunity’ Lock & Talk safe firearm and medication storage and lockandtalk.org Adverse Childhood Experiences training Prevent suicide in BIPOC: afsp.org/elevating-voices-for-long-lasting-change-town-hall-series#part-three--preventing-suicide-in-bipoc-communities--ways-forward  Fairfax County Police Department locations Kognito online suicide prevention training Drug disposal information from the Fairfax County Health Department Mental Health First Aid (virtual training sessions coming soon) REVIVE! opioid overdose reversal training [Get a printable calendar.]

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Oct

24

10:00AM, In conjunction with DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back…

Oct

27

10:00AM, REVIVE! trains individuals on what to do and not do in an overdose…

Oct

29

9:00AM, REVIVE! trains individuals on what to do and not do in an overdose…

Oct

28

5:00PM, Monthly meeting of the full CSB Board, which will be held…

About the Health & Human Services System

The Community Services Board is a part of the Fairfax County Health & Human Services System (HHS). The HHS System is a network of county agencies and community partners that support the well-being of all who live, work, and play in Fairfax County.

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