Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

Fairfax County, Virginia

 

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Emergency - 703-573-5679 Detox - 703-502-7000 (24/7)

703-383-8500 | TTY 711

8221 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive
Fairfax, Virginia 22031

Daryl Washington, Executive Director

Community Services Board logo

WHAT WE DO

The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board provides services for people of all ages who have mental illness, substance use disorders and/or developmental disabilities.

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Need emergency help?

Call 911 if immediately life-threatening and ask for Crisis Intervention trained officer.

Emergency mental health services 24/7
703-573-5679   TTY 711

Fairfax Detoxification Center 24/7
703-502-7000 
TTY 703-322-9080

Or come directly to the Merrifield Center

Need information & services?

For other CSB services, call CSB Entry & Referral
703-383-8500   TTY 711
Mon. – Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Come directly to the Merrifield Center for a screening
Mon. – Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(Extended youth hours until 7 p.m. on Tues.)

Learn more about services for...

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CSB News

Image with "your design here" text

July 12, 2019
The new Fairfax Prevention Coalition (FPC) is sponsoring a logo contest, open to the entire community. The mission of the FPC is to empower community members to understand, prevent and reduce substance misuse, with a vision of making Fairfax County a healthy and safe community, free of substance misuse. Data from the Fairfax County Youth Survey 2017-2018 indicated that alcohol use, opioid use and vaping/e-cigarettes are the most misused substances among youth. Logo designs should reflect the mission of FPC to empower the community to understand, prevent and reduce substance misuse, with a vision of making Fairfax County a healthy and safe community free of substance misuse. Submissions are due no later than Friday, August 9, 2019. First place winner will be awarded $300; second and third places will receive gift cards. The logo will be used as the official logo of the Fairfax Prevention Coalition. Get involved; help make Fairfax County a safer, healthier community for all. Submit entries by email to Lori Naveda. Individuals should include their name, email address and phone number along with their entry. Download the contest flier and guidelines.

Image noting June 27 is PTSD Awareness Day

June 26, 2019
PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) Awareness Day, a day devoted to encouraging open discussion about PTSD, its causes, symptoms and about getting help, is observed Thursday, June 27. Much of what is done to observe PTSD Awareness Day involves encouraging open talk about PTSD, its causes, symptoms, and most importantly, getting help. PTSD is often misunderstood by those with no firsthand experience with the condition or those who suffer from it. The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board (CSB) has resources that can help. A free, online screening for individuals who are troubled by shocking, painful events that have occurred in their lives is available on the CSB website. Results are confidential. The screenings take less than five minutes and results include resources, referral information, and articles that can help address PTSD. While anyone can experience PTSD, many veterans struggle with substance use disorders, mental health conditions (such as PTSD), and trauma. These issues can be exacerbated by the loss of structure and camaraderie found in the military, and research continues to link substance use disorders with service-related mental illness. Such conditions increase the likelihood of involvement with the justice system. In fact, 81% of justice-involved veterans had a substance use disorder prior to incarceration, and 25% were identified as mentally ill. Through collaborative efforts, Fairfax County is trying to improve outcomes for veterans who have become involved with the criminal justice system. "I can honestly say the Veterans treatment court kept me going; it kept me alive." The Fairfax Veterans Treatment Docket (VTD), one of 334 across the country, is an integral part of Fairfax County's comprehensive Diversion First initiative, which aims to improve outcomes and offer alternatives to incarceration for people with mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders (SUD) who come into contact with the justice system. More than 76,000 veterans reside in Fairfax County (U.S. Census Bureau, 2018). Veterans face unique needs and challenges, as it is estimated that 75% of veterans have substance use treatment needs and many are diagnosed with co-occurring mental health disorders, including PTSD, TBI and/or have experienced military sexual trauma. Currently, it is estimated that 22 veterans die by suicide each day. These unique challenges have caused many veterans to become entangled in the criminal justice system. The VTD program provides intensive treatment and supervision to justice-involved veterans to address the criminogenic risk and treatment needs in an effort reduce recidivism rates and to enhance veterans' ability to engage in a meaningful and productive life. Learn more about Fairfax County’s Veterans Court Docket. For more information about general CSB services, call CSB Entry & Referral at 703-383-8500, TTY 711, or come directly to the Merrifield Center for a screening, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Emergency mental health services are available 24/7 by calling 703-573-5679, TTY 711, or come directly to the Merrifield Center's lower level. The Fairfax Detoxification Center is also available 24/7 at 703-502-7000, TTY 703-322-9080.  

Nurse of the year graphic

June 19, 2019
CSB Nurse of the Year award recipients Angella Ogala and Jennifer Hansborough with CSB Director of Nursing Louella Meachem. This week the Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board (CSB) recognized three members of their nursing team as 2019 "Nurses of the Year." More than 80 nurses work throughout the CSB, helping to promote quality of life for people receiving mental health, substance use disorder and developmental disability services. Licensed practical nurses, registered nurses, clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners serve on interdisciplinary teams in outpatient, residential, day support, homeless shelters, detoxification and clinical settings. Staff nominated and selected three of them to honor with this year’s Nurse of the Year award: Angela Amas, NP, Medical Services Jennifer Hansbrough, RN, Addiction Medicine Clinic Angella Ogalo, LPN, Residential Intensive Care Central CSB Nurse of the Year award recipient Angela Amas. Angela Amas collaborates well with colleagues from across the CSB in a variety of settings. She’s been working in support of jail diversion, a Vivitrol pilot project (part of treatment plans for opioid dependencies), and the Addiction Medicine Clinic’s Office-Based Opioid Treatment. Additionally, Angela works in support of the CSB’s Project for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) team and serves homeless individuals in need of psychiatric services. Jennifer Hansbrough begins a discussion with: "how can we get to YES?" She assists clients in overcoming obstacles to help them get the support they need to aid in their path towards recovery. Her mantra is "every voice matters" and she works to create an equitable, just, and productive work environment. Her current assignment is nursing supervisor at the CSB’s Addiction Medicine Clinic, where she’s a leader in fighting the opioid epidemic. Angela Ogalo works to support residents in one of the CSB’s residential programs. In addition to her education, support and medical role, Angela goes above and beyond to help clients find affordable medications, helps with complex insurance issues and reaches out to community partners and resources to provide medical and psychiatric support for each client she serves. The CSB’s Director of Nursing, Louella Meachem, organized ceremonies across the county to recognize the three nurses, as well as the solid work efforts provided by all CSB nurses every day. "Nurses are on the front lines of the CSB and provide many critical services, such as checking clients' vital signs to subscribing medications to case management and assessment services. Without these core services that our nursing team provides, our clients would not be receiving the same high level of care. Our nursing team is vital to the CSB." Learn more about nursing careers with the CSB.

Photo of workshop panelists

June 19, 2019
The Regional Resource Panel was moderated by Brandi Jancaitis, Military and Veterans Affairs Manager, Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services and included Travis Rahill, SFC, US Army Retired, Outreach Program Manager, Melwood Veterans Services; Kaye Larson, Military OneSource; Caleb Johnson, Northern Regional Director, Virginia Veteran and Family Support DVS; and Dusty Baxley, Executive Director, Boulder Crest Retreat for Military and Veteran Wellness.  Over 100 professionals from across Northern Virginia came together for a Regional Military Culture and Suicide Prevention Summit on June 17 at the Fairfax County Government Center. The goals of the summit, sponsored by Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services (DBHDS), were to increase military cultural competency, including understanding service members’ and veterans’ unique behaviors, values and characteristics; bolster regional partnerships between federal, state and local partners; and highlight best practices to prevent suicide among military service members, veterans, and their families.  Virginia has the eighth largest veteran population and the fourth largest active duty population in the United States, home to roughly 720,000 veterans and 89,000 active duty members of the military. Sessions included an introduction to military culture and a discussion on lethal means safety, which is limiting access to highly lethal means of suicide, such as firearms and certain prescription medications, for service members and veterans who are in crisis. The summit also featured an overview of the CSB’s new Lock & Talk Northern Virginia program. The event wrapped up with a regional resource panel and a question and answer session which was moderated by Brandi Jancaitis, Military and Veterans Affairs Manager, Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services, and included panelists: Travis Rahill, SFC, US Army Retired, Outreach Program Manager, Melwood Veterans Services Kaye Larson, Military OneSource Caleb Johnson, Northern Regional Director, Virginia Veteran and Family Support DVS, and Dusty Baxley, Executive Director, Boulder Crest Retreat for Military and Veteran Wellness. One of the objectives throughout the conference was to identify resources for service members, veterans and their families, caregivers and providers. An attendee stated, “The summit has been a success in opening my eyes to the resources available through Northern Virginia for military service members, veterans, and their families. I’ve made some great contacts and have a better understanding of lethal means safety for the military and veteran culture.” William H. Williams, Director of CSB Operations and Emergency Management and a military veteran, provided opening and closing remarks at the summit. At the summit’s closure, William H. Williams, Director, CSB Operations/Emergency Management and a military veteran, commented on the theme that ran through the summit: “compassion… people who are fixed on helping persons who have served their country in the most dramatic situations. I really thank you for that.” Suicide is a growing concern; it was the 10th leading cause of death in the United States in 2017. Between 2003 to 2016, more than 3,000 veterans or service members died by suicide in Virginia. The Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board’s (CSB) Wellness, Health Promotion & Prevention Services staff engage and involve the community in activities to help strengthen emotional health, increase awareness and build resiliency skills to handle life stressors. Services are provided throughout the county and include community-focused workshops, campaigns to raise awareness and improve health, and evidence-based programming including how to recognize and assist someone who is experiencing depression and anxiety, how to recognize the signs and symptoms of suicide and how to build resilient communities. CSB’s Wellness, Health Promotion and Prevention staff attend community events to provide information and answer questions about CSB’s prevention program and services.  For more information or to request a staff presentation, contact Marla Zometsky, 703-559-3000, TTY 711. For more information about general CSB services, call CSB Entry & Referral at 703-383-8500, TTY 711, or come directly to the Merrifield Center for a screening, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Emergency mental health services are available 24/7 by calling 703-573-5679, TTY 711, or come directly to the Merrifield Center's lower level. The Fairfax Detoxification Center is also available 24/7 at 703-502-7000, TTY 703-322-9080.  

Closeup photo of shoes walking on grass

June 17, 2019
CSB's BeWell team is hosting the a series of health and emotional wellness workshops at the Northwest Center beginning Thursday, June 27 from 5 to 7 p.m. This hands-on, free community workshop series will focus on how food, exercise and sleep affect one’s health, mood and behavior: “You Are What You Eat & What You Do: How Food, Exercise and Sleep Affect Health, Mood and Behavior." Register to attend the workshop.

Get Involved

CSB Board CSB EventsDiversion First Interns & volunteersOnline and in-person trainingSuicide Prevention Alliance of No. Va. Welcoming Inclusion Network Youth Council

UPCOMING EVENTS

Jul

22

11:30AM, REVIVE! trains individuals on what to do and not do in an overdose…

Jul

23

11:30AM, REVIVE! trains individuals on what to do and not do in an overdose…

Aug

07

9:30AM, Trying to decide if having a roommate is right for you? Need help…

About the Health & Human Services System

The Community Services Board is a part of the Fairfax County Health & Human Services System (HHS). The HHS System is a network of county agencies and community partners that support the well-being of all who live, work, and play in Fairfax County.