Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District

Fairfax County, Virginia

CONTACT INFORMATION: Our office is open 9AM-5PM M-F

12055 Government Center Parkway
Suite 905, Fairfax, VA 22035

Laura Grape,
Executive Director

Conservation Currents Newsletter

For soil and water conservation events, information and updates, the Conservation Currents newsletter is sent out quarterly in print and via email. To subscribe, please contact us with your email or mailing address. You may also choose to receive (please specify when you contact us):

  • Watershed Calendar monthly emails, which include stream monitoring and other events;
  • Green Breakfast notifications, which include information about speaker events six times a year.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Feb

01

9:00AM, This year's seedling sale features shrubs and trees that are tolerant…

Feb

10

9:30AM, Reduce runoff on your property and protect water quality! Learn how to…

Mar

10

8:30AM, Join us for the next Green Breakfast! To be notified when the Green…

Mar

24

10:00AM, Rain barrels capture water from your downspouts to reduce runoff,…

Reforest Fairfax Gift Card

October 30, 2017
When you need to say thank you, consider a gift that will last a lifetime: the gift of trees. Through Reforest Fairfax, a partnership between the Fairfax County Restoration Project and Fairfax ReLeaf, five native trees will be planted for each gift you give, and a beautiful card and certificate will be sent to your recipient. By giving trees, you will be helping to ensure a beautiful and healthy place to live and work long into the future. Trees clean our air and water, protect our streams, prevent soil erosion, lower city temperatures, and boost property values. When you give the gift of trees, you're not just saying thank you; you're helping to plant our future. To learn more or to give a gift, visit Reforest Fairfax.

Green and Clean brochure cover

August 30, 2017
The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) works with lawn care companies to encourage watershed-friendly lawn maintenance in the Commonwealth. Lawn care companies voluntarily enter into a water quality agreement with the agency. They agree to train their employees to use lawn care products responsibly, follow appropriate lawn fertilization practices and provide environmentally sound advice to customers. In return, DCR maintains a list of watershed-friendly lawn care operators that is available to the public. This year, consider choosing a watershed-friendly lawn care company or, if you take care of your own lawn care, consult the DCR publication Green & Clean to try home lawn care - the watershed-friendly way.

Current Issue

Community Conservation Success

Conservation Landscaping Project at Chesterfield MewsThe District's Conservation Assistance Program (CAP) provides technical expertise and funding for energy and watershed projects throughout the Northern Virginia region. Learn more about the program and what projects have taken place in Fairfax communities.

Seven Myths about Rain Gardens

Rain Garden during a stormA rain garden is a great way to handle runoff on your property, but it is important to do it right. Learn about some common rain garden myths and misconceptions.

Potomac Vegetable Farms, Conservation Heroes

woman on tractor by farm standFor more than 50 years, the Newcomb family and associates have owned and operated the Potomac Vegetable Farms in Vienna. They grow and sell a variety of fresh, delicious vegetables, cut flowers, eggs and chickens. PVF was also recognized as the 2016 Clean Water Farm, taking action to protect local soil and water resources.

More Featured Articles

Discover Early Spring Wildflowers

Mayapple emerges. Credit: Gary Putnam, Arlington Regional Master Naturalists Looking forward to spring? Ready to open the windows for some fresh air and take a walk or bike ride on your favorite local trail? While you’re out, take a look at the splashes of color by the trailside and see if you recognize any of the early wildflowers. These spring ephemerals only bloom for a short time every spring.

It's Spring: Hold on to Your Fertilizer

Woman mows grass Contrary to popular practice, spring is not the time to fertilize your lawn. If you fertilize in early spring, the blades will grow at the expense of the roots developing. Extra fertilizer will run off into streams and rivers, polluting fisheries and local drinking water sources.

Home Turf: Virginia Healthy Lawns

Home Turf volunteer measures distance Virginia Cooperative Extension's Home Turf program brings Master Gardener expertise to the grasses in lawns across Northern Virginia.

Chickens in Your Backyard

A rooster and hen. Interest in locally grown food is on the rise, from urban gardening to backyard chicken operations. Can Fairfax County residents keep chickens? How can owners care for chickens? What is the best way to manage chicken waste?
 

Other Popular Articles

Land and Conservation

 

Water: Streams, Ponds and Water Quality

 

Soil, Plants, Trees and Wildlife