Department of Family Services

Fairfax County, Virginia

CONTACT INFORMATION: Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

703-324-7500
TTY 711

12011 Government Center Parkway, Pennino Building
Fairfax, VA 22035

Michael A. Becketts,
Director

Domestic and Sexual Violence Services – Strategic Plan

2022–2025

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Message from the Division Director

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On behalf of the Department of Family Services’ Division of Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS), I am pleased to present our 2021-2026 strategic plan to improve services to residents of Fairfax County and enhance collaboration with partners, non-government organizations (NGOs), community groups and key stakeholders.

This plan represents a culmination of nearly three years of deep organizational analysis guided by strategic reflection. We studied the history of racial and social justice movements, and their impact on the field of interpersonal violence. We gathered input from community partners and stakeholders and reviewed best practices. We analyzed data to identify the most impactful actions we can take in the next five years to support all persons impacted by interpersonal violence. Collectively, we decided our path forward.

When we started this journey in Spring, 2018, we never imagined how the world and our communities would forever be changed by the devastation of the COVID-19 pandemic and the social injustices that shook our collective conscience. It is under this context that DSVS finalized our mission, vision and values. Although Fairfax County adopted the One Fairfax policy in the Fall of 2017, the murder of George Floyd brought disparities and issues of social justice to the forefront. We placed equity and access in the center of our planning process to inform our approach for how we can better serve those who need us the most.

We have been altered. There is no going back.

During the pandemic, interpersonal violence increased in number and severity as layoffs, stay-at-home orders, and income loss exacerbated situations at home, which were already unsafe for many. The Department of Family Services, like many agencies around the nation, quickly pivoted to provide virtual services. DFS took a people-focused approach and centered ourselves on the personal health and safety of the staff and our community members while continuing to provide high quality services.  As a bonus, we discovered the value of improved technology on our ability to serve the community and engage our partners.  We learned the importance of flexibility and agility.

We are different now…more nimble…more resilient...more strategic. This strategic plan reflects all we have learned about ourselves and our communities.

On behalf of the DSVS leadership team, I invite you to review the plan and share in our excitement about the future. We look forward to working side by side with our partners and stakeholders to create and strengthen collaborative efforts to improve the safety and wellbeing of all persons impacted by interpersonal violence.

I am eternally grateful for the contributions of DSVS staff, partners, and survivors in the development of this strategic plan and I look forward to these ideas becoming action.

Sincerely,
Division Director, DSVS

Executive Summary

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In January 2020, the Department of Family Services Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DFS-DSVS) kicked off an effort to develop a three- to five-year strategic plan, to optimally meet the needs of the community, and the various stakeholders that it serves. This plan was developed to ensure alignment of goals, objectives, and priorities with Fairfax County’s overarching strategic plan and goals to provide equitable outcomes for all Fairfax residents.

The DSVS Strategic Plan was completed in April 2021 and was designed to ensure that planning for the future is set on a firm foundation. Core to this strategic planning effort is the alignment with the Countywide Strategic Plan and the One Fairfax Policy, in order to meet the needs of the community and advance the work on efforts to mitigate racial and social inequities, and ultimately advance equity. The Department has worked to align these areas and create a shared vision for our workforce. Under the leadership of Toni Zollicoffer and the DSVS Strategic Plan Steering Committee (Appendix A), the group worked over a period of fifteen months to reconceptualize our vision, mission, and core value statements using the lens of One Fairfax and the goal of partnership in making a collective impact with the Strategic Plan.

The following principles guided the strategic planning work: 

  • Drive towards ensuring equitable services and outcomes for Fairfax County residents.
  • Build sensitivity and agility to respond to the rapidly external environment.
    • COVID
    • Social Unrest
    • Changing Political Landscape
  • Align with County’s overarching Strategic Plan, One Fairfax and the Department of Family Services mission, vision and values.
  • Comprehensively assess and identify both available and needed resources to successfully execute the strategic plan.

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Department of Family Services (DFS) Mission, Vision and Core Values

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The Department of Family Services focuses on:

  • Safety and protective services for children, older adults, people with disabilities, and victims of domestic and sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking.
     
  • Supportive programs that build on the strengths and resilience of families, children, people with disabilities, and older adults so they can thrive.

These services mitigate crime, abuse, and neglect; lessen the strain on public safety and judicial resources; increase the workforce and tax base; improve self-sufficiency and educational outcomes; and create an environment where all residents have opportunities to contribute to the success of the community. They are delivered collaboratively and with compassion, through people-focused practices that encourage innovation and demand accountability.

The DFS mission statement defines who we are and what we do. A vision statement defines what we aspire to be. Values are the guiding principles that shape our behavior and actions. Together this triad serves as the foundation for the Department of Family Services from which structures are built, plans are developed, and services are provided. The strategic goals that we develop within our program areas—and in concert with the County’s strategic priorities—are what we strive to do in support of the values and our daily activities on behalf of the people we serve and those who serve them. Together these elements make our agency a stronger, focused organization.

Mission

The Department of Family Services (DFS) strengthens the well-being of our diverse community by protecting and improving the lives of all children, adults, and families through partnership, advocacy, outreach, and quality services.

Vision

Fairfax County is a community where everyone lives their success story and thrives.

Core Values

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  • Meeting People Where They Are. Each employee of DFS focuses on the people we serve to deliver value and make a positive impact on their lives and communities in which they live. We recognize that the individual is the expert in their own life and with empathy and compassion, we work in partnership to resolve challenges.
     
  • Welcoming Every Voice. Each DFS team member is engaged as a valued partner in our work. Each voice is vital to the success of the organization no matter what role a person has in the Department, everyone is a valued contributor. Each employee actively contributes to a culture of mutual respect, dignity, and service.
     
  • Investing in Employee Growth and Development. Investment in employees’ success, professional growth, and development is central to the success of our organization. By making this investment, the department is committed to ensuring that employees have the tools to be successful in their roles, have opportunities to learn and employ new skills, and are supported in mastering their roles to provide exemplary service.

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  • Embracing Collective Action. While our core principle of teamwork solidifies and strengthens our relationships, we need to move beyond empathy and solidarity to embrace the power of collective action. DFS recognizes that if we are to make significant strides towards true equity and physical and psychological safety for our workforce and for every person we serve, there are operational changes and action steps that must be taken. While we realize our individual efforts may be awkward and unchartered, DFS has long fought to secure equal footing for those we serve. We are well-positioned to create and operationalize steps to reduce inequities and address systemic oppression which hampers the growth and wellbeing of our communities.
     
  • Rejecting Oppression. We unequivocally reject racism, violence, and bigotry in all its forms, including the systemic racism directed at people of color which has been woven into the fabric of our policies, procedures, and practices. DFS further rejects the criminalization of people of color, both native-born and immigrant. While we have specifically called out some forms of bigotry such as racism and xenophobia, we intentionally and collectively advocate for each person’s right to physical and psychological safety, justice, and access to opportunity. DFS is committed to moving the system away from its oppressive underpinnings through critical self-examination and reflexive practice.

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  • Practicing Good Stewardship. We are dedicated public servants and exercise great care in our efficient management of County resources.
     
  • Acting with Integrity. We always serve with honesty and transparency and pride ourselves in doing the right thing, even when no one is looking.
     
  • Taking Ownership. We accept responsibility and ownership for our work, our decisions, our successes, and our shortcomings. We engage in proactive communication and use our voices to elevate challenges and actively seek solutions.
     
  • Managing with Data. We engage in data-driven decision making, making sure our work is achieving the desired results, and monitor and adjust our approach and business processes accordingly.

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  • Embracing Partnership and Alignment. We recognize that to achieve our mission and make our vision a reality, we are not able to make system-level nor client-level changes in isolation. Strategic partnership at all levels – with clients, co-workers, within and across departments, and with community partners and other jurisdictions are required. We seek opportunities to collaborate, plan and align our work at all levels for the benefit of our community members.
     
  • Expect the Diversity of Perspectives. We are dedicated to ensuring a diversity of voices and experiences. We are strengths-focused and strive in our inclusiveness to create the best outcomes for our community and its residents.

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  • Striving for Learning and Continuous Improvement. We challenge the status quo and advocate for new and innovative approaches to our work to advance the effectiveness of our work and the wellbeing of our community. As a learning organization, we embrace failing forward – taking risks, learning from mistakes, and building on successes. We are bold and creative in problem solving. We encourage and empower employees to take measured risks.
     
  • Embracing New Opportunities. We constantly seek to enhance existing partnerships and create new partnerships, funding sources and service improvements. We adjust to changes in our environment with flexibility and agility.
     
  • Encouraging Diversity of Perspectives. We will genuinely encourage and listen to all ideas without judgment. We will actively seek input from and encourage full engagement of people from all different levels and perspectives. Employee involvement is intentional, with representation across impacted areas.

About Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DFS-DSVS)

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The Department of Family Services’ Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS) offers compassionate and comprehensive state-accredited programs for adults, teens, and children who have been affected by domestic and sexual violence, stalking and human trafficking. DSVS also offers services to coordinate and improve systems’ and communities’ responses to domestic and sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking.  

DSVS administers a variety of programs and services designed to improve the safety and well-being of individuals, families, and communities. These programs and services provide essential support for County residents who face multiple, often overlapping challenges and vulnerabilities.  DSVS’ services are offered virtually and in person at multiple sites in Fairfax County. The services directly provided by DSVS and in partnership with community organizations provide the framework for a strong, equitable, and resilient Fairfax County: safe communities, a thriving economy, improved quality of life, and opportunities for everyone to feel connected and engaged. 

Specifically, DSVS provides the following services and programs. 

ADAPT
Anger & Domestic Abuse Prevention and Treatment. We offer a certified 18-week domestic abuse intervention program that will teach you skills to prevent abuse through the development of compassion for yourself and others.

Advocacy Services
We offer information, referrals, and support with a plan to help keep you safe. We help you through the court process, assist you with protective orders, and attend court hearings with you. We also offer guidance with housing and economic options.

Community Engagement Services
Community Education, Outreach, and Prevention. We offer workshops, talks, and table displays for community and faith-based groups, businesses, and schools.

Training and Guidance
We offer training, guidance, and support for people who work with victims and survivors.

Exam for Victims and Survivors
Our staff and volunteers will meet you at the Inova Fairfax Hospital Ewing Forensic Assessment and Consultation Team (FACT) Department to provide you with support.

Domestic and Sexual Violence 24-Hour Hotline 703-360-7273
We offer information, referrals, guidance, and support to help keep you safe. We are available by telephone 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Emergency Shelter: Artemis House
We connect victims and survivors to emergency shelter and support. Available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Volunteer Services
You can help make a difference! Volunteers are an important part of our mission in providing support to our community.

Counseling Services
We offer counseling services for you and your family. Services include individual and family counseling for children and teens who have been sexually abused or have seen domestic violence. We also offer group counseling.

Countywide Coordination
We bring our community together to figure out what barriers exist and how to overcome them.

DSVS Mission, Vision and Core Values

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DSVS mission, vision, and core values frame and operationalize our services and are aligned with the County’s Strategic Plan, One Fairfax, and DFS Strategic vision. 

Mission

We work with communities to transform society’s response to domestic violence, sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking by challenging oppression, collaborating to inform policy and providing all persons impacted by violence with equitable access to trauma informed support, advocacy, education, and a space for healing.

Vision

Peaceful, thriving, powerful communities where all people are safe and free from oppression, fear, and violence.

Core Values

  • Collaboration: We cultivate, develop, and maintain community-focused collaborative relationships based on unique strengths, diverse perspectives, and shared purpose.
  • Trauma-Informed: We are calm, consistent, reliable, and foster resilience in relationship with our clients. Through advocacy, education, outreach, policy, and services, we promote community understanding of traumatic stress and its effects. We conduct consistent and rigorous evaluation of our practices, policies, and procedures to implement process improvements.
  • Person-centered: We honor individuals as experts in their own lives and work in partnership to achieve positive outcomes.
  • Empathy: We show genuine care, interest and validation for others’ thoughts, feelings and perspectives by respectfully listening without judgment.
  • Accountability: We are transparent in all of our work and communication with internal and external stakeholders and take responsibility for the quality and results of our work.
  • Equity: We advocate for all community members to have fair access to available opportunities, resources, and support so that they may meet their full potential.
  • Manage with Data: We engage in data-informed decision making, making sure our work is achieving the desired results, and monitoring and adjusting our approach and business processes accordingly.

Preparing for Strategic Planning

In the Spring of 2018, a group of dedicated DSVS staff formed a community engagement workgroup to review the DSVS 2016 environmental scan, and to conduct community surveys and focus groups with partner organizations. The committee, led by Keesha Coke, was comprised of six other DSVS staff: Colleen Armstrong, Ayaan Ali, Sarah Freeman, Mery Juarez, James Miller, and Zahra Rehman. The workgroup’s activities were facilitated by Anne Suh of Fairfax County’s Organizational Development and Training division (OD&T). Over several months, the workgroup conducted 4 focus groups with 20 partner agencies and received 391 qualifying responses to its community survey. The Department of Family Services Data Analytics unit compiled and analyzed the survey and provided DSVS with a report of their findings.

In January, 2020 SZH Consulting, LLC through a competitive Request for Proposals process was hired to lead DSVS through its strategic planning process. Results from the work of the community engagement committee, along with organizational documents and data were provided to SZH Consulting. This information formed the foundation to begin the strategic planning process. The COVID-19 pandemic, at its height in March 2020, caused delays and the strategic planning work did not begin in earnest until late summer, 2020. In August and September 2020, DSVS participated in a two-day history lesson about how the movement to end violence against women began and who was included and excluded from protection. This was seminal to the DSVS strategic planning process and provided the foundation for updating its mission, vision, and values.  

Aligning DSVS Core Values with DFS Core Values

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DSVS Values Aligning with DFS Values
Person-Centered People-Focused
Equity Equity
Empathy People-Focused/Equity
Trauma-Informed People-Focused/Equity
Accountability Accountability
Collaboration Partnership
Manage with Data Accountability/Innovation

SWOT Analysis

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Our overall process started with a SWOT analysis to get a clear understanding and alignment on what DSVS does well, what might be opportunities for improvement, and what could come in the way of optimally realizing the organization’s mission and vision.

Strengths

Internal advantages that give DSVS an edge over fulfilling its mission.

  • Responsiveness to client needs by compassionate staff.
  • Delivering educational information.
  • Effective community partnership and networking.
  • Internal communications (strong, flows-well, transparent).

Weaknesses

Internal characteristics of DSVS that put it at a disadvantage; come in the way of success.

  • Limited insight into the needs of diverse, under-served and/or marginalized communities.
  • Limited understanding of and outreach to non-English speaking communities.
  • Lack of prioritizing efforts based on resource capacity.
  • Data informed decision-making.

Opportunities

External elements that DSVS could use to its advantage.

  • Address broader, and increasingly diverse, needs of people who use DSVS services and develop non-criminal justice/alternative responses to domestic and sexual violence.
  • Further embed and amplify outreach in the community through various channels.
  • Improve grant development process.
  • Improve/elevate services to address sexual violence, human trafficking and stalking.
  • Strengthen relationships with external partners.
  • Renewed public discourse and attention to social unrest related to systemic oppression.

Threats

External elements in the environment that could cause trouble for DSVS/come in the way of success.

  • Heightened social and political tensions.
  • Shrinking budgets and limited resources.
  • Limitations to how we share or don’t share information.
  • Public mistrust of government and governmental agencies.

Strategic Path Approach

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The Strategic Planning process was guided by a Steering Committee composed of representatives from DSVS functional teams, community partners, a representative from Fairfax Office of the Chief Equity Officer, and a survivor/former recipient of DSVS services. The role of the Steering Committee was to ensure that the strategic plan reflected the collective voice of and representation from across key DSVS roles and stakeholders. Through the SWOT Analysis, the Steering Committee voted to use “strengths to maximize opportunities” as the optimal strategic path for DSVS, which then led to the identification of six key Strategic Priority Areas.

Each committee member formed larger working groups, leveraging the engagement and expertise from the greater DSVS team, for each of the six key Strategic Priority Areas. Every DSVS staff member participated and contributed to the formulation of the Strategic Plan. They embarked on data collection, research, and cross-team collaboration to identify for each priority area, the opportunities and challenges related to the area, relevant SMART goals, key performance indicators and success measurements. This Strategic Plan represents a culmination of the work by the teams, with input from the community.

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The following section provides in-depth overview of the six Strategic Priorities that have been identified for DSVS.

DSVS Strategic Priorities

Priority Area 1

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Priority Area 1: Integrating an Equity and Social Justice Lens into all parts of the work in a meaningful way.

Introductory Statement

DSVS will re-evaluate its philosophical approach and assess whether its approach has applicability to a diverse population of victims/survivors. DSVS will use information (data and best practices) to make appropriate changes to be more responsive to the diverse needs of victims from differing backgrounds, ages, and gender identities. Key areas to address are: true victim choice and self-determination, access to meaningful services, and the systems’ ability to build in natural and community support and resiliency into the Coordinated Community Response (CCR). 

For purposes of this document and for the scope of work, DSVS serves and defines victim/survivor as any person who has been assaulted by a non-caregiver and/or physically, sexually and emotionally abused in an intimate partner relationship. DSVS also serves victims/survivors of stalking in intimate partner relationships and survivors/victims of human trafficking. For intimate partner violence, DSVS recognizes that a victim of domestic violence may experience harm at the hands of another and/or may perpetuate the harm done to them by harming others. In the context of domestic violence, DSVS supports the healing and safety of victims who are harmed and also provides opportunities for victims who do harm to be accountable and make behavioral changes that support and enhance safety.

Outcome Statement

As a result of this priority area, over the next three years, all programs and services within DSVS will practically integrate equity and social justice focuses into its work with individuals, partners, stakeholders and the community. DSVS staff will have increased knowledge and skills to permeate equity into all policies, procedures, and practices and will have a working knowledge of intended and unintended consequences of policies and how they impact those served. DSVS will regularly engage in courageous conversations about systemic and institutional racism as it relates to the work of DSVS and will have built-in opportunities for staff to engage in self-care. DSVS programs and services will reflect the needs and wants of a diverse community, will reach a broader, more diverse population and will offer relevant and meaningful services and programs.

Challenges/Opportunities

  • There is not shared understanding across DSVS about systemic oppression and its impact on marginalized persons and families.
  • There are opportunities to fully integrate education about systemic oppression and its impact on persons who experience interpersonal violence into all programs and services.
  • In gathering data, there is not common language or understanding of the difference between race and ethnicity in defining demographics across databases.
  • There are limitations in demographic choices to capture gender and gender fluidity. As a result, it is difficult to code data accurately to reflect the various populations we serve.
  • DSVS also has limitations with data integrity and with collating and synthesizing data captured in multiple databases and spreadsheets.
  • Data indicates that there is disparate utilization of services along race and ethnicity descriptors for what are described as “high-touch” and “low-touch” services.
  • Since the incidence of domestic violence is not more prevalent in one race, ethnicity or socio-economic group, it is important to understand who is accessing emergency shelter services and why and what intersectional issues make it more or less likely for someone to seek emergency shelter.
  • Partnerships are not expansive enough for DSVS to have a true pulse on the needs, gaps, and desires of diverse populations and communities.
  • Messaging to the public that those who do harm can also be a victim of interpersonal violence, maltreatment as a child or a child witness to domestic and/or sexual violence.
Goals

1. Serve with proficiency historically marginalized populations, increasing the diversity of clients in all programs and services (direct and systems’ services).


2. Leverage existing partnerships with NGOs/community groups that serve historically marginalized populations to better serve these populations.


3. Transform workforce in knowledge base, skill set, diversity, and in ability to have courageous conversations (with accountability).


4. Infuse equity into all parts of DSVS’ policies and practices.


5. Infuse social justice framework into DSVS practice.

Success Metrics

1.1 Number of individuals from identified historically marginalized populations served in the county.

1.2 Percent of identified historically marginalized populations utilizing services who report feeling respected and supported when receiving DSVS services (Year 2).


2.1 Number of partnerships cultivated with NGOs/ community groups that serve or represent historically marginalized populations with regards to DSVS service areas.

2.2 Percent increase in referrals from existing partners that serve historically marginalized populations related to DSVS services (Year 2).

2.3 Number of new initiatives/ programming delivered in response to needs and requests of historically marginalized populations with regards to DSVS service areas (Years 2 and 3).


3.1 Percent increase for all staff in acquisition of knowledge related to equity and equitable outcomes.

3.2 Percent of staff able to demonstrate application of concepts related to equity and equitable outcomes (Year 2).


4.1 Number of DSVS policies and practices that have been reviewed and revised using the One Fairfax framework to address equity and equitable outcomes (Year 2).


5.1 Number of DSVS programs and services that engage in social justice activities through information, education, and advocacy that have been reviewed and revised using the One Fairfax framework to address equity and equitable outcomes (Year 3).

Measurements

1.1 Regular data pulls of demographics of individuals served per program or service.

1.2 DOW surveys; regular customer satisfaction surveys (Year 2).


2.1 Surveys, qualitative feedback from identified partners.

2.2 Data pulls of percent change in number of referrals from existing partners that serve historically marginalized populations (Year 2).

2.3 Net increase in the number of joint projects/initiatives with existing partners (Year 2).

2.3.1 Number of new services/programs delivered by DSVS (Year 3).


3.1 Results of training pre and posttests; qualitative data through observations and reports by supervisors of staff’s knowledge acquisition, staff self-report and assessment.

3.2 Results of self-assessment pre and posttests; qualitative data through observations and reports from supervisors of staff’s knowledge acquisition, staff self-report and assessment (Year 2).


4.1 Inventory of DSVS policies and practices revised to address equity and equitable outcomes (Year 2).


5.1 Inventory of engagement in social justice activities (Year 3).

Priority Area 2

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Priority Area 2: Assessing, Improving and Deepening Partnerships

Introductory Statement

People impacted by domestic and sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking experience barriers to getting help and participating fully in Fairfax County communities. Removing these barriers requires more than just the services of this agency. It requires a coordinated and community response framework that includes culturally-specific and neighborhood-specific organizations, service providers, civic groups, and other diverse institutions through which people access the community. DSVS seeks to support and build community partners’ access to information, skills, services, and other resources to increase their capacity to help. DSVS will elevate, connect, and learn from the expertise of community organizations, especially those that work with underserved populations. DSVS will seek to support the people and organizations this population already turns to for help.

Outcome Statement

Fairfax County DSVS, through community identified best practices and standards, will evaluate, develop, and maintain committed, trusted, and diverse partnerships. DSVS and its partners will create and strengthen agency to agency relationships with mutual benefits, input, and collaboration for both organizations by using an agreed upon framework for partnership engagement and community asset mapping to address the needs of those impacted by domestic and sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking including underserved populations. Increased focus and attention will be given to communities that have been historically underserved or under-engaged and to collaborating with trusted people and organizations within these communities.

Challenges/Opportunities

  • How will the community have the capacity and resources to help all of those in need?
  • How does DSVS engage in partnerships with individuals and institutions that might not have paid staff, organizational structure, or services such as neighborhoods, social networks, and culturally specific communities?
  • Culture shift of identifying and utilizing a partnership framework as our guide for assessing and improving partnerships (e.g., moving beyond personal relationships).
  • Lack of an existing mechanism which would enable DSVS to consistently consult, communicate and share information about partnerships (e.g., moving beyond personal relationships).
  • How does DSVS engage in the era of COVID?
  • Will the organizational leadership allow for a balance of managing outcomes/widgets and the time it takes to build partnerships?
  • How will financial challenges be considered/accounted?
  • How are support and assistance to victims/survivors provided that utilize knowledge and expertise of non-professionals such as family, friends, and trusted community members? 
  • The current community model, even within culturally specific services, tends to use a paradigm of helpers as professionals (advocacy, counseling, legal counsel, etc.).
  • An opportunity to reach out into the community to build trust through assessment of resources, strengths, and underserved.
  • Leveraging countywide coordination/CES/ DVAC teams to strengthen partnerships (trainings and outreach).
  • NCS has a lot of experience building and sustaining system wide communication (how does DSVS maximize this opportunity).
  • Community partners can offer sustainable and excellent programs through diverse professional expertise and technical assistance.
  • An opportunity to strengthen a framework around partnership development that could have lasting impact on the community.
Goals

1. Determine traditional/nontraditional partnership framework with the following elements:

  • Partnership definition.
  • Partnership engagement.
  • Partnership identification.
  • Open and continuous communication.
  • Shared measurement for data and results.
  • Commitment to common shared agenda of goals focused on system change.
  • Training for staff and our community partners.
  • Client-driven.
  • Asset mapping.

2. Develop and complete assets map of existing resources to serve underserved and marginalized communities. 


3. Expand partnerships based on the partnerships framework with traditional organizations and providers.


4. Explore and develop partnerships with non-traditional professional providers to support the community:

a. Training curriculum.
b. Development of ongoing process for support and engagement.
c. Promotion of county and community resources and services.
d. Marketing and recruitment plan.


5. Increase and enhance partnerships with organizations (small and not well-resourced) that have built and developed trusted relationships with underserved and marginalized communities.

Success Metrics

1.1 Identification of partnership framework.


2.1 Completed Asset Map.


3.1 Number of partners that agree to become a member of the partnership framework.

3.2 Number of staff and partners that get trained in the framework.

3.3 Improvement in the quality-of-service delivery to clients as a result of partnership framework.


4.1 Number of non-traditional/non-professional partners providers (ambassadors) identified.

4.2 Number of individuals/ambassadors that get trained in the framework. 

4.3 Percent of ambassadors that agree to participating in the framework.

4.4 Improvement in the quality-of-service delivery to clients as a result of partnership framework.


5.1 Percent of partnerships with the organizations that serve underserved and marginalized communities.

5.2 Percent of partners that indicate their involvement with our organization enhances their work with marginalized and underserved community.

5.3 Number of people in underserved populations impacted by violence accessing services and resources in the community (measure community-wide and measure increase over time).

Measurements

1.1 Written approval of the identified partnership pramework.


2.1 Asset mapping is completed for all relevant areas.


3.1 Increase in number of partners.

3.2 Pre and post measure of knowledge gained of the framework through training (review of Nintex forms).

3.3 Quarterly or semi-annual review of Partner Surveys/RBA.


4.1 Increase in number of ambassadors.

4.2 Pre and post measure of knowledge gained of the framework through training (review of Nintex forms).

4.3 Quarterly or semi-annual review of Ambassador Surveys.


5.1 Increase in number of partnerships with orgs that serve underserved and marginalized communities.

5.2 Quarterly or semi-annual review of the Satisfaction Surveys with orgs. that serve marginalized and underserved communities.

Priority Area 3

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Priority Area 3: Improving/elevating services to address sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking.

Introductory Statement

The current deficit in Sexual Violence (SV) services must be addressed in several areas: coordinated community response; training for staff and partners; SV-specific outreach and partner projects; client services, and alliances and joint efforts with communities disproportionately affected by SV. 

Attention to SV services requires a shift in frame from immediate physical safety to long-term emotional safety, active listening, SV civil advocacy and medical assistance. An emphasis on active partnership and collaboration is needed to enable allied organizations and communities to benefit diverse victims of SV and advocate together on other forms of inequities and victimization. 

DSVS plays an active role in county and statewide responses to human trafficking (HT) but is unable to contribute the same level of engagement as it does to domestic and sexual violence. Addressing human trafficking should focus on coordination with existing providers in Fairfax County, and with the statewide response to HT. DSVS should also clarify their role in addressing stalking in Fairfax County as it relates to domestic and sexual violence and collect data about its prevalence both inside and outside the context of intimate partner violence.

Outcome Statement

By elevating the issues of sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking, DSVS will facilitate an effective coordinated community response to the issues at an appropriate level based on need. DSVS will determine its identity in relation to sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking: partners and community members will be more aware and knowledgeable about SV/HT/stalking and related issues, and staff and volunteers will be trained and better able to support victims and survivors. Partnerships with SV/HT/stalking service providers, community organizations, and other community resources will be built and deepened, and survivors will have greater access to appropriate services.

Challenges/Opportunities

  • Identity as a sexual violence organization – How will DSVS communicate this to the community?
  • Develop partnerships and build trust with community organizations not currently involved in sexual violence work, and how to determine if/when it is appropriate to do so (ex. DV focused orgs, public health orgs, culturally specific advocacy organizations, faith communities).
  • Label SV work and workers without creating silos or overburdening staff.
  • Conduct systems advocacy with law enforcement to reduce re-traumatization of victims of sexual violence and human trafficking.
  • Provide and/or support legal services for victims/survivors of sexual violence and human trafficking.
  • Assign/recruit specialized sexual violence staff and increase knowledge of all staff and volunteers about sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking.
  • Collect and assess data on sexual violence advocacy outreach and prevention work.
  • Address language access and use of culturally relevant models for addressing sexual violence (particularly with underserved populations).
  • Engage communities with histories of oppression leading to mistrust of government and other systems.
  • Incorporate peers and survivors into DSVS work safely and effectively without creating staff burden or friction.
  • Additional staff/time needed to acquire funding, provide technical assistance, and coordinate county human trafficking response (typically state-level coordination).
  • Empower survivors (and staff) with knowledge about stalking and equip them with knowledge about how to protect themselves from stalking behaviors.
Goals

1. Create a sexual violence identity within DSVS by educating staff and volunteers, labeling SV efforts, and prioritizing sexual violence both in the strategic planning process and as an agency. The development of  a sexual violence identity within DSVS will be both informed by and impacted by program planning, outreach efforts, capacity and knowledge-building, direct service provision, and partnerships with external stakeholders.


2. Build internal capacity to respond to sexual violence by allocating resources to SV-specific services and outreach, training staff and volunteers on SV-specific issues, developing and updating policies and procedures related to SV, and maintaining continuous assessment of sexual violence services.


3. Foster awareness among county residents and allied professionals in the Fairfax County community regarding the issues of sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking through education, allyship, and coordinated outreach.


4. Foster a coordinated community response to sexual violence focused on building, expanding, and maintaining partnerships and alliances to improve access to resources for all victims/survivors of sexual violence and their communities.


5. Develop opportunities for peer and survivor participation into SV work in collaboration with community partners.


6. Strengthen agency and community-wide focus on human trafficking (sexual exploitation) by supporting and coordinating partner organizations in the county and collaborating with statewide response to serve victims of human trafficking.


7. Clarify and strengthen the role of DSVS in community response to stalking within and outside of the context of intimate partner violence in Fairfax County.

Success Metrics

1.1 Percent of community members will demonstrate increased knowledge regarding sexual violence services and resources.

1.2 Percent increase in programming, goals and objectives specifically to address sexual violence.


2.1 Percent of staff and percent of volunteers trained on how to respond to sexual violence and know available resources for survivors within DSVS and in the community.

2.2 Percent of staff and volunteers report that they feel confident and knowledgeable about addressing sexual violence in their work.

2.3 Number of systems walkthroughs completed or reevaluated in the context of sexual violence services.


3.1 Number of sexual violence outreach events, trainings and/or campaigns conducted.
 
3.2 Number of attendees/people reached (community members, allied professionals, etc.).

3.3 Net increase in knowledge of sexual violence and related topics among attendees.

3.4 Increased communication with community about SV trainings, campaigns, and awareness events.


4.1 Percent of sexual violence outreach projects that include coordination and participation by partners.

4.2 Number of SV specific trainings provided to partners by or through DSVS.

4.3 Increased cooperation with legal, medical, educational, and culturally relevant service providers for sexual violence clients.

4.4 Increased number of partnerships with organizations engaged in anti-oppression work.


5.1 Increased survivor participation in the development and/or implementation of sexual violence programming.


6.1 Net increase in technical assistance and support offered to or brokered) on behalf of member organizations to build capacity to respond to human trafficking.

6.2 Number of trafficking focused coordination groups or projects DSVS actively participates in.

6.3 Number meetings held with countywide human trafficking coordination group.

6.4 Number of organizations engaged with countywide coordination body.


7.1 Percent of DSVS staff and percent of volunteers will demonstrate increased knowledge of stalking and DSVS’ response to stalking.

7.2 DSVS will have a clear definition of stalking to be used internally and with the community.

7.3 Percent of DSVS programs and services will develop goals related to stalking.

Measurements

1.1 Community survey data.

1.2 Metrics specified in Goals 2, 3, and 4.


2.1 Number of staff and volunteers who have been trained on sexual violence 101.

2.2 Pre- and post-tests utilized in sexual violence trainings.

2.3 Updated job descriptions and training requirements for new and current staff.

2.4 Survey of staff members regarding sexual violence knowledge.

2.5 Number of staff who regularly participate in SV projects including training, coordinating bodies, campaigns, workgroups, etc.


3.1 Pre- and post-training evaluations by attendees.

3.2 Number of attendees of sexual violence community outreach events and training.

3.3 Number of sexual violence outreach events conducted annually.

3.4 Data regarding social media engagement.


4.1 Number of outreach projects involving partnership.

4.2 Number of partner organizations showing continued engagement with coordinating bodies.


5.1 TBD; Model for survivor participation must first be identified.


6.1 Number of meetings of statewide and regional coordination efforts attended by DSVS staff.

6.2 Number of partners engaged with county coordination body.

6.3 Creation of an assigned position to address human trafficking and sexual exploitation.


7.1 Survey of DSVS staff and volunteers to determine current understanding of stalking.

Priority Area 4

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Priority Area 4: Becoming more Data-Informed

Introductory Statement

Improve programming and decision making through strategic and consistent use of data. DSVS will develop methods to consistently use data to inform decision-making that will improve equity in processes and outcomes for clients. Current program data is captured, cleaned, analyzed and stored on a regular basis. Opportunities to improve use of data to inform decision making include having all staff have access to and skills to use data to inform decision-making; multiple points of entry for data access, and limited data collection in some program areas.

The strategies in this section seek to provide a coordinated and systematic approach to increasing data capacity in DSVS to include human capital, organizational, and technology development. Through training of front line, supervisory, managerial, administrative and technical staff, DSVS will increase organizational capacity to use data to inform practice. Data Dissemination strategies will be solidified and routinized to ensure easy access to data at all levels in the organization. In collaboration with other DFS partners, technology will be used to enhance current data collection, analysis, and availability to end users to continue to inform decisions that are made to improve overall service delivery to clients.

Outcome Statement

DSVS will collect and use data to:

  • Document DSVS work, efforts, and work products.
  • Make informed decisions and choices that support equity.
  • Prove impact to funders, partners, community, and county. 
  • Answer questions from within and outside DSVS, such as how much/often, who, why.

To support these data efforts, DSVS will:

  • Ensure that staff is educated so data is useful to them.
  • Incorporate data from outside DSVS.
  • Provide tools for staff, partners, and community to access useful data.
  • Ensure that data is collected efficiently, and data is relevant and accurate.

Challenges/Opportunities

  • The need to define benchmarks based on outcomes and goals.
  • Some county wide data is available but there are different collection measures and it is difficult to crosswalk data among systems.
  • There isn’t a universal definition of domestic violence across programs to know about prevalence and who is impacted.
  • Disparate data systems to collect all required data; lack of comprehensive tool to capture, analyze, store, and present data.
  • Lack of staff training in specified data tools (MS Power BI).
  • Resources have not been geared towards connecting with data from partner and other county agencies that could inform practice.
  • Lack of understanding of the limitations of VAWA and data collection and creating solutions that honor VAWA but allow the ability to use the data to inform practice.
  • Staff training and level setting about the purpose of data and how to use it to inform practice and improve services.
Goals

1. Maximize the clarity and completeness of data across DSVS.


2. DSVS will use data effectively in decision-making and to establish interventions.


3. Data collection, storage, dissemination and analysis will be managed ethically, responsibly and in compliance with local and federal laws.


4. DSVS staff will have working knowledge on how to use data successfully and have a basic level of data literacy in relation to DSVS metrics, accessing systems and program data.

Success Metrics

1.1 Percent of data systems and reports will provide percent of timely and accurate data for decision making, reports, and staff use.

1.2 Percent of reduction in dual data entry (Streamline case data entry requirements – could measure this in the number of fields to enter a case, or time spent.

1.3 Percent of DSVS data systems will have users trained in a Unified, consistent, standard data collection effort.

1.4 Percent of DSVS staff will have access to on-demand software tools that allow for viewing of relevant data for decision making, monitoring, self audit, and quality assurance.


2.1 At least percent of DSVS programs will have robust and clearly defined set of benchmarks and KPIs.

2.2 At least percent of programs and services will be able to determine benchmark equitable outcomes.

2.3 Percent of DSVS employees will respond positively to pulse surveys about the use of data in day-to-day work.

2.4 At least percent of relevant policies and procedures, group and individual supervision templates, and onboarding materials have embedded components related to use of data.

2.5 At least percent of staff will have completed and shown mastery on training related using DSVS data successfully and incorporating data into the day-to-day work.

2.6 Percent of time data is pulled from at least two reliable third party data sources in annual reports and other outward facing documents as evidenced by annual document reviews.


3.1 Percent of DSVS data systems will be compliant with all federal and local laws, using a Data Governance framework.
 
3.2 Percent of DSVS staff members are trained on ethical and responsible use, storage, analysis, and dissemination of data.

3.3 Percent of “Lessons Learned” Ethics Advisory Committee issues will be addressed within a timeframe.


4.1 At least percent of staff will have completed and shown mastery on training related using DSVS data successfully and incorporating data into the day-to-day work.

4.2 DSVS will incorporate at least percent of vetted terms into the organization’s vernacular such as onboarding, training materials, team meetings, etc.

Measurements

1.1 Number of DSVS programs that capture and report race and ethnicity data.

1.2 Number of as is business processes mapped, with ID of dual data entry points.

1.2.1 Number of trainings on data literacy with pre and post training knowledge assessment/test.

1.3 Number of reporting tools and new report methods developed.

1.4 Number of interactive data projects created.


2.1 Regular surveys, staff at all levels will be able to articulate KPIs for their service areas and how their work directly contributes to them.

2.2 Number quarterly team meetings with DA Team by program.

2.3 Number of Data Ambassadors identified.

2.3.1 Number of Regular Data presentations/discussions.

2.4 Review of P&Ps to assess whether the materials have embedded components related to the use of data.

2.5 Pre/post tests.

2.6 Reliable source information cited in annual report and other outward facing documents.


3.1 Decrease in number of systems that are not compliant with Federal and local laws.

3.2 Number of data governance policies established.

3.3 Number of external data requests that are responded to using identified data informed practices.


4.1 Pre/post tests.

4.2 Number of vetted terms incorporated into onboarding, training materials, and team meeting agendas.

Priority Area 5

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Priority Area 5: Updating Technology, Systems and Processes

Introductory Statement

DSVS provides services and supports to high-risk domestic and sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking victims and survivors.  The division maintains several stand-alone data repositories that are not aligned. For the quantity of data and broad range services the division provides, this inefficiency causes redundancies in data entry and impacts extraction, quality, storage, and integrity of data. Updating technology systems and processes has been designated as a strategic priority to ensure improved access to services; timeliness and quality of services; regulatory compliance (federal, state, and local); streamlining of processes; and improvement of efficiencies for staff. Data is captured for the following services:

  • Counseling services for victims of domestic and sexual violence, stalking and human trafficking.
  • Advocacy services for victims of domestic and sexual violence, stalking and human trafficking.
  • Hospital Accompaniments (SANE and IPV).
  • Domestic violence intervention program for perpetrators of violence.
  • 24/7 Crisis Lines (DV Hotline and LAP line).
  • Emergency Shelter (Artemis House).
  • Community Engagement Services (via Outreach and Education events).
  • Volunteer Management System.
  • Varying administrative processes (e.g., emergency resources; referrals, Speaks requests, waitlists).

Outcome Statement

DSVS will have the best possible solutions in breed, enterprise-wide technology system(s) with integrated business intelligence and associated business processes that provide ease of use, data integrity, data integration, data reporting, and adherence to requisite levels of regulatory compliance.

Challenges

  • DIT, Internal County Audit, and other programs that guide County technology and data storage requirements are less familiar with federal and state statutes that govern DSVS to inform technology, systems and data decisions.
  • Input Data Validation - there is a low level of ‘intelligence’ built-in to safeguard against erroneous / inconsistent / missing data input.
  • Searches and Queries - there is limited capability to search through client records for particular terms, service attributes, demographic characteristics etc.; no real-time data; no clinical notes or billing codes data.
  • Report Customization - changes to existing ‘canned’ reports entail special development charges and lengthy lead times.
  • Report Generation - there is no capability to produce existing reports in near real-time; reports are run in batch mode overnight.
  • Data Import/Export - there is no practical method for importing or exporting data to/from the CP database and exchange data with other tools and repositories; data must be manipulated externally, starting with CSV flat files.
  • Caseload Management - there is no practical capability or features for caseload management built into the system.
  • Supervisory Review of Caseload Management - current systems lack business intelligence processes to conduct audits and quality assurance reviews to support staff with utilization, caseload management, and strategic learning opportunities.
  • Status Snapshot Display - there are no dashboard-type graphic display features available.
  • DocuSign - current process consists of multiple steps and is not user friendly for clients; provider shares IP address, which is PHI.
  • For one reason or another, current system is not being utilized to its fullest potential across all programs.
  • Reduce redundant data entry in multiple systems.
  • Programs/staff feel siloed within their programs.
  • Communications tend to happen just within programs.

Opportunities

  • Require technical support users, within or partnering with, DIT, County Attorney, Internal Audit, etc. to guide adoption of technology, systems, and data management processes in compliance with Federal, State and local regulatory mandates.
  • Develop training/super users to have better understanding of all the tools/features available through the system.
  • Provide continuous training for updates.
  • Enact use of common forms/tools that can be shared across programs.
  • Expand/maximize use of all functions/features available within existing system(s).
  • Engage with other organizations to examine how systems can intersect or come up with a process on how data from one system can be transferred to another (not staff).
  • Increase the capacity of all DSVS staff’s general knowledge and skills to be able to support other program areas, understand the work of other programs, eliminate silos.
  • Expand internship program to BA level, or reassess how interns are used within programs.
  • Identify a central intake process/person/platform to unify all programs.
  • Improve communication across all programs.
Goals

1. Upgrade existing technology to be  VAWA compliant  (software and hardware) and to address the inefficiencies, redundancies, and systems challenges.


2. Mitigate barriers and improve ease of Access and Utilization of technology.


3. Capitalize on strategic funding opportunities that align with DSVS’ goals and objectives.

Success Metrics

1.1 Percent increase VAWA compliant systems being used across all programs.

1.2 Percent of technology that is modernized.

1.3 Net reduction in the number of data storage repositories being used across all programs (lagging metric/requirement for new technology).

1.4 Net increase in number of partial or fully automated workflows (lagging/requirement metric).

1.5 Net reduction in duplication of effort for documentation in multiple systems (lagging metric).


2.1 Net increase in the number of standardized policies and procedures across the division to establish consistency of technology usage with local, state, and federal requirements.

2.2 Net increase in continuous quality improvement processes embedded into DSVS services and programs.

2.3 Number People trained in use of new technology/number of user manuals (self-help guides) created.


3.1 Net increase in the number of applications submitted to fund technology goals.

3.2 Net increase in the number of applications approved that meet tech goals.

3.3 Net increase in the number of budget requests made to Fairfax County for technology upgrades.

3.4 Net increase in personnel and resources dedicated to support DSVS technology.

Measurements

1.1 Establish IT requirements matrix for a minimum of 2/4 systems.

1.2 Establish IT requirements matrix for a minimum of 3/7 communication platforms with clients.

1.3 System Completion Established policies and procedures for VAWA, VA Code technology adherence for DSVS.

1.4 Established IT roadmap that includes tracking of data captured, sources of data, and dual data entry requirements.


2.1 Review 100% of DSVS technology related policies and procedures.

2.2 Eliminate 100% of outdated or irrelevant technology related policies and procedures.

2.3 25% of remaining technology related policies and procedures will be standardized into a designated format.


3.1 Two funding opportunities will be approved for DSVS technology enhancements.

3.2 Full integration of DFS IT POC into DSVS technology support processes.

Priority Area 6

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Priority Area 6: Streamlining DSVS Services

Introductory Statement

DSVS is a small division within the Department of Family Services. Issues of domestic and sexual violence, human trafficking and stalking intersect with the work of many of the county’s agencies and departments. As such, DSVS’ services and programs are broad in scope, making it challenging to focus on areas where the need is greatest, and the harm is most severe. The scope of this priority area will be to focus DSVS efforts to ensure the greatest impact of services to targeted populations in a more efficient, cost-effective, and productive manner.

Outcome Statement

As a result of this priority area, DSVS will deliver evidence informed programs and services that yield the greatest impact to the community and advance the mission and vision of DSVS. DSVS will have an established process for determining its activities, programs and services that align with the stated goals and objectives of the division.

Challenges/Opportunities

  • DSVS has a multitude of services that are broad in scope, leaving little room for deeper focus and work in areas such as prevention and technical assistance (as well as other areas).
  • With the given resources, DSVS is unable to give adequate focus to all of the core issues which fall within our mission and vision, such as sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking.
  • Data that can inform decisions may be limited and/or unavailable.
  • Lack of clarity internally and externally on who we are tasked to serve as it relates specifically to domestic and sexual violence, Interpersonal violence (IPV), human trafficking and stalking.
  • There is a lack of clarity between DSVS’ role as government versus role as a direct service provider.
  • Multiple points of entry into services presents inadvertent challenges (e.g., gaps, redundancies). Due to lack of focused service delivery, outcomes and targets may not be most representative (e.g., reliable vs. valid service delivery).
  • This is an opportunity to redesign services in a way that proactively and collaboratively addresses community needs and adapts to new and emerging trends/best practices.
  • To develop strategic focus for underdeveloped areas in DSVS such as prevention and technical assistance.
  • Define service populations.
  • Clarify distinctions and overlap between role as a governmental agency and service provider.
  • Make the workload more manageable and efficient, giving employees a sense of self-efficacy in their work.
  • Scrub and analyze data for intentional usage to guide service delivery.
  • If multiple entry points is a challenge, this could create an opportunity to consider a form of coordinated entry.
  • Clarify outcomes.
Goals

1. Integrate and consolidate common internal processes across DSVS into a core model that promotes efficiency, consistency, and accountability across all programs and services.


2. Intentional shift from less impactful to more impactful programs and services across the division.


3. Organize and deliver external services and programs more effectively and efficiently.


4. Capitalize on strategic grant opportunities that align with DSVS’ goals and objectives. 

Success Metrics

1.1 Net reduction in the number of duplicative processes performed for multiple programs, services, staff requests.

1.2 Net increase in number of partial or fully automated workflows.

1.3 Net reduction in duplication of effort for documentation in multiple systems (dependency with technology priority).

1.4 Net increase in the number of standardized policies and procedures across the division to establish consistency with local, state, and federal requirements.

1.5 Net increase in the number of DSVS processes that are subsumed by DFS.

1.6 Net increase in continuous quality improvement processes embedded into DSVS services and programs.


2.1 Net increase in DSVS’ programs, services, and activities that meet a defined impact threshold.


3.1 Increase in the net utilization of all active trainings, events, services and programs.

3.2 Increase in the number of activities and events conducted in partnership with other disciplines where outcomes for survivors are disparate.

3.3 Increase in the number of technical assistance provided.

3.4 Net improvement in access to available county-wide programs and services to marginalized and underserved communities.

3.5 Net change in the access to DSVS programs and services including service delivery in communities not currently being served.


4.1 Number of grants that meet goals of strategic priorities.

4.2 Number of grant submissions that meet strategic priorities and have budgeted infrastructure and grants management support.

Measurements

1.1 Baseline of P&Ps and workflows.
 
1.1 Number of P&Ps and workflows identified for improvement.

1.2 Number of workflows identified to be moved to partial or full automatization.

1.3 Number of programs that implement new recommended technology.

1.4 Number Successfully fulfilling accreditation checklist pertaining to P&Ps.

1.5 Number of DSVS processes identified to be subsumed by DFS.

1.6 Number of continuous quality improvement processes embedded.


2.1 Impact threshold researched, developed and applied.


3.1 Total number of customers/clients served in educational, engagement, and outreach activities.

3.1 Total number of direct services, community engagements/outreach and advocacy activities and macro-level interventions.

3.1 Resource utilization (e.g., value composite – how much time and resources are spent on an activity vs. the value to the community or to advancing the mission) .

3.2 Number of partners from other disciplines that sign an MOU with DSVS.

3.2 Number of partnership activities and events done in collaboration that address intersectionality or disparate outcomes across systems for survivors.

3.3 Net increase in the number of technical assistance activities provided to other organizations.

3.4 Collaborative meeting (DVAC, DV Network) focused on assessing the efficacy of coordination of services with our partners.

3.5 Expansion of community-based services in communities that want them.

3.5 Improved language.


4.1 Number of grants that have been approved by funder to refine work plans to better align with DSVS strategic priorities.

4.2 Analysis of new grant applications that meet goals and meet the cost/benefit threshold (e.g., funding for support infrastructure, reporting, project management).

4.2 Receipt of grant awards that include funding allocation for infrastructure and/or grant management support.

Aligning Key Strategic Priorities with DFS and DSVS Values

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Strategic Priority

Priority Area 1: Integrating an Equity and Social Justice Lens into all parts of the work in a meaningful way

DFS Value(s)

Equity

  • Embracing collective action.
  • Rejecting oppression. 

People-Focused: 

  • Meeting people where they are.
  • Welcoming every voice.
  • Investing in employee growth and development.

DSVS Value(s)

Equity
We advocate for all community members to have fair access to available opportunities, resources, and support so that they may meet their full potential.

People-Focused
We honor individuals as experts in their own lives and work in partnership to achieve positive outcomes.

Empathy
We show genuine care, interest and validation for other’s thoughts, feelings and perspectives by respectfully listening without judgement.

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Strategic Priority

Priority Area 2: Assessing, improving and deepening partnerships

DFS Value(s)

Partnership

  • Embracing Partnership and Alignment.
  • Expect the Diversity of Perspectives.

DSVS Value(s)

Collaboration
We cultivate, develop, and maintain community-focused collaborative relationships based on unique strengths, diverse perspectives and shared purpose.

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Strategic Priority

Priority Area 3: Improving/elevating services to address sexual violence, human trafficking, and stalking

DFS Value(s)

Partnership

  • Embracing partnership and alignment.
  • Expect the diversity of perspectives.

Accountability

  • Practicing good stewardship. 
  • Acting with integrity. 
  • Taking ownership.
  • Managing with data.

Equity

  • Embracing collective action.
  • Rejecting oppression.

DSVS Value(s)

Collaboration
We cultivate, develop, and maintain community-focused collaborative relationships based on unique strengths, diverse perspectives and shared purpose.

Trauma- Informed
We are calm, consistent, reliable, and foster resilience in relationship with our clients. Through advocacy, education, outreach, policy, and services, we promote community understanding of traumatic stress and its effects. We conduct consistent and rigorous evaluation of our practices, policies, and procedures to implement process improvements.

Accountability
We are transparent in all of our work and communication with internal and external stakeholders and take responsibility for the quality and results of our work.

Equity
We advocate for all community   members to have fair access to available opportunities, resources, and support so that they may meet their full potential.

Empathy
We show genuine care, interest and validation for other’s thoughts, feelings and perspectives by respectfully listening without judgement.

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Strategic Priority

Priority Area 4: Becoming more data-informed

DFS Value(s)

Accountability

  • Practicing good stewardship. 
  • Acting with integrity.
  • Taking ownership.
  • Managing with data.

DSVS Value(s)

Manage with Data 
We engage in data-informed decision making, making sure our work is achieving the desired results, and monitoring and adjusting our approach and business processes accordingly.  

Accountability
We are transparent in all of our work and communication with internal and external stakeholders and take responsibility for the quality and results of our work.

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Strategic Priority

Priority Area 5: Updating Technology, Systems and Processes

DFS Value(s)

Accountability

  • Practicing good stewardship. 
  • Acting with integrity.
  • Taking ownership.
  • Managing with data.

DSVS Value(s)

Accountability
We are transparent in all of our work and communication with internal and external stakeholders and take responsibility for the quality and results of our work.

Manage with Data 

We engage in data-informed decision making, making sure our work is achieving the desired results, and monitoring and adjusting our approach and business processes accordingly.

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Strategic Priority

Priority Area 6: Streamlining DSVS Services

DFS Value(s)

Accountability

  • Practicing good stewardship. 
  • Acting with integrity.
  • Taking ownership.
  • Managing with data.

DSVS Value(s)

Accountability
We are transparent in all of our work and communication with internal and external stakeholders and take responsibility for the quality and results of our work.

Manage with Data
We engage in data-informed decision making, making sure our work is achieving the desired results, and monitoring and adjusting our approach and business processes accordingly.

The Path Forward

Appendix A

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Steering Committee Members

Toni Zollicoffer, Angela Yeboah, Gretchen Soto, Mery Juarez, Stacy Ziebell, Soo Jin Kim, Keesha Coke, Laura Haggerty-Lacalle, Alycia Blackwell, Evan Braff, Debra Ranf, Robin Wilson, Abigail Picard, Kader Gumus

Working Group Members

Kadia Beckford, Heather Potter, Michelle Mueller, Andrea Nunez-Gardner, Linda Concepcion, JD Miller, Ara Jo, Didier Stom, Alma Martinez, Jeannette Aleman, Gulira Alieva, Vanessa Cullers, Michelle Mueller, Helen McDonald, May Riddelln, Alaha Ahrar, Rebecca Albert, Harleen Jassal, Erin Salisbury, Ayaan Ali, Brittany Vera, Chris Davies, Karen David, Sam Bachman, Lynne Rowson, Ana Villalta-Hernandez, Kathryn Harlow, Jennifer Perkins, Sarah Freeman, Debra Miller, Sandra Emo, Kevin Ochs, Angela Acosta, JoAnn Rojas        

SZH Consulting Team Members

Salima Hemani, Jamie Price, Megan Hutchison

Appendix B

DSVS strategic plan page banner graphic (design only)

Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS)

Community Feedback Survey Findings


Qualifying Respondents

429 respondents filled out the DSVS Community Feedback Survey. However, the survey starts off by asking the two following questions to qualify if respondents are able to continue filling out the survey. 

1. Are you currently above the age of 14?
2. Are you currently a Fairfax County resident?

If both questions were answered “yes,” then the respondent qualified to continue filling out the survey. 91% or 391 respondents were over the age of 14 and current Fairfax County residents.

Percentage of Respondents Who Qualified to Continue the Survey
January-February 2020, n=429
91% Qualified
9% Did Not Qualify

Percentage of Respondents Who Qualified to Continue the Survey graph


Demographic Data

Of all the qualifying respondents, 341 or 87% provided demographic data across all categories.  Nearly two thirds (64%) of those that responded to these questions were between the ages of 35 and 64 years old, the vast majority were female (82%) and/or heterosexual (87%). Survey respondents were largely White (70%), however, it is important to note that the survey was created in several different languages, and that a small number of surveys that were completed in a language other than English are not included in this analysis. When analyzing responses by Race/Ethnicity, we will compare White vs Non-White as overarching categories, due to the small sample sizes of any race/ethnicity other than White.1 If race/ethnicity data is not mentioned below, there was not a significant difference in responses for that question.

1For the purposes of this report out, Non-White includes Asian/Pacific Islander, Black or African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Other. Other includes those of more than one race.  “Prefer not to answer” and blanks were kept separate.

Demographics A (n=341)

Age, Percentage
14-17 years old, 1%
18-24 years old, 4%
25-34 years old, 11%
35-44 years old, 22%
45-54 years old, 19%
55-64 years old, 23%
65-74 years old, 11%
75 years or older, 5%
Prefer not to answer, 4%

Gender Identity, Percentage
Female, 82.1%
Male, 14.1%
Non-Binary, 0.3%
Transgender, 0.3%
Prefer Not to Answer, 3.2%

Demographics B (n=341)

Sexual Orientation
Asexual, 1.5%
Bisexual, 2.3%
Heterosexual, 87.1%
Gay, 0.0%
Lesbian, 0.9%
Pansexual, 0.9%
Other, 0.3%
Prefer not to answer, 7.0%
    
Race/Ethnicity
Asian/Pacific Islander, 6%
Black or African American, 7%
Hispanic or Latino, 8%
Native American or American Indian, 0%
White, 70%
Other, 3%
Prefer Not to Answer, 6%

There were 49 different responses on which zip code respondents reside in, the top 10 of which are included in the chart below. The top two zip codes identified were 22003, located in Annandale, at 6.7% and 22042, located in Falls Church at 6.5%.

Top 10 Zip Codes of Respondents
January-February 2020, n=341
6.7% 22003
6.5% 22042
5.9% 22030
5.0% 22309
4.7% 22043
4.1% 22015
4.1% 22032
3.8% 22153
3.5% 20120
3.2% 20121

Top 10 Zip Codes of Respondents graph


Have you, or anyone you know, experienced any of the following? Check all that apply.
There were 376 respondents who answered the question above. To focus on the prevalence of abuse, the answer “none of the above” was omitted from the chart on the right. For informational purposes, 32% of the 376 respondents had answered “none of the above.” Percentages for this question will add up to higher than 100% as respondents could elect more than one option. Again, respondents were given the option of selecting more than one type of abuse. This fact begs the question, of those who experienced or knew of abuse (254 respondents), how many types of abuse were experienced? What combinations of abuse are most prevalent? The chart to the left shows the prevalence of experiencing multiple types of abuse. Of those who experienced abuse 56% experienced the combination of Domestic Violence and Sexual Violence, followed by 37% of respondents who experienced the combination of Domestic Violence and Stalking. 

Types of Abuse Experienced/Known by Survey Respondents
January-February 2020, n=376
59% Domestic Violence
45% Sexual Violence
29% Stalking
5% Sex Trafficking

Types of Abuse Experienced/Known by Survey Respondents graph

Of Those Who Experienced/Knew of Abuse, How Many Types Reported?
January-February 2020, n=254
33% 1
35% 2
27% 3
5% 4

Of Those Who Experienced/Knew of Abuse, How Many Types Reported?


Did you or the person(s) you know receive services in Fairfax County related to the domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, or sex trafficking?
Almost all respondents (253 respondents) who experienced or knew of someone who experienced abuse answered the question above. The majority of respondents identified that no services were received after abuse. Of the 253 respondents, 95 did receive services after abuse, 158 did not.

Did You or the Person You Know Receive Services?
January-February 2020, n=253
38% Yes
62% No

Did You or the Person You Know Receive Services? graph


Who provided services? Check all that apply.
Almost all respondents who received services (93 respondents) identified who provided services. For the purposes of this report, the top six most frequent providers of services are highlighted in the chart below. Listed below the chart are the service providers that are not in the top six. As respondents could choose multiple service providers, percentages will add up to over 100%.

Regarding race/ethnicity, White and non-White respondents access  the top service providers at approximately the same rate. The only exception to this is The Women’s Center with 32% of non-White2 respondents receiving services from The Women’s Center compared to 47% of White respondents.

2The sample size for non-White respondents is low (n=22). More data would validate if this is a true disproportionality.

Top 6 Most Frequently Used Service Providers
January-February 2020, n=93
61% Domestic Violence Action Center (DVAC)
58% Friend/Family
44% The Women's Center
43% Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS)
37% Fairfax Co. Court (e.g., protective order, divorce)
37% Fairfax Co. Court (e.g., protective order divorce)

Other service providers identified:
Community Organizations (12%) 
Counseling services in Fairfax County (34%)
Other – SafeSpot Children’s Advocacy Center of Fairfax County (2%)
Religious Group, church, or institution (19%)
School (e.g., college/university or child’s school) (15%)
Shelter in Fairfax County (20%)
Unsure from where (11%)

Top Six Most Frequently Used Service Providers graph


Were there things that prevented you or the person(s) you know from receiving help in Fairfax County?
As identified on the top of page 3, 158 respondents identified that services were not received after the abuse happened. 152 of these respondents answered the question asking if there were things preventing them from receiving help in Fairfax County. The majority (98 of the 158) of respondents identified that there was nothing that prevented them from receiving help. 54 respondents identified that there were things preventing them from receiving help.

Regarding race/ethnicity, non-White3 respondents had higher rates of barriers to receiving help (46%) when compared to White respondents (32%).

3Again, the sample size for non-White respondents is low (n=35). More data would validate if this is a true disproportionality.

Were there things that prevented you or the person(s) you know from receiving help in Fairfax County?
January-February 2020, n=152
64% No
36% Yes

Were there things that prevented you or the person(s) you know from receiving help in Fairfax County? graph


What prevented you or the person(s) you know from receiving help in Fairfax County? Check all that apply.
52 respondents who identified that there were things preventing them from receiving help chose to answer this question. Almost two thirds of the respondents who answered this question, were prevented from receiving help in Fairfax County due to not knowing where to go to get help. The chart below outlines the top three reasons why respondents were prevented from receiving help. As respondents could choose more than one option, percentages will add up to over 100%. Listed below the chart are the other prevention reasons that did not make the top three. 

What prevented you or the person(s) you know from receiving help in Fairfax County?
January-February 2020, n=52
65% Did now know where to get help.
56% Fear of situation getting worse.
31% Did not identify incident(s) as domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, or sex trafficking.

Other reasons you or the person(s) you know were prevented from receiving help:

  • Was not a resident of Fairfax County at the time of the abuse. (13%)
  • Against cultural norms. (10%)
  • No transportation to access services. (10%)
  • Concerns about immigration status. (6%)
  • Program did not have capacity or waitlist. (2%)
  • Abuser ran away and officers never contacted me again. (2%)
  • Abuser was my husband. With small children, I was afraid I could not support them on my own. (2%)
  • Fear related to organized crime and sex trafficking. (2%)
  • Help was not available during the time I was sexually abused and then later on was physically abused. (2%)
  • No one could help me until my stalker made a specific threat of violence, according to police. They couldn’t help until a crime was committed. (2%)
  • Not enough physical evidence, mental and emotional violence leaves no physical bruises. (2%)
  • Uncomfortable with government agencies. (2%)
  • Was handled by my office security. (2%)
  • Was told not enough abuse by my lawyer. (2%)
  • Services not available in preferred language. (0%)4

4Refer to the demographics data section on page one regarding the data on non-English speakers. 

What prevented you or the person(s) you know from receiving help in Fairfax County? graph


Have you heard of Fairfax County Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS) – formerly known as the Office for Women and Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (OFWDSVS)?
Of the 364 respondents to this question, 167 of them, or slightly less than half (46%) had heard of DSVS.

Percentage Who Have Heard of DSVS
January-February 2020, n=364
54% Not Heard of DSVS
46% Heard of DSVS

Have you heard of Fairfax County Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS) – formerly known as the Office for Women and Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (OFWDSVS)? graph


How did you learn about Fairfax County Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS)? Check all that apply.
All 167 of those from the previous question also responded to how they learned of DSVS. Just over a third (35%) of the respondents reported that they learned about it through the county website (44% of non-White5 respondents vs. 31% of White respondents), followed closely by word of mouth (29%) and a training or presentation (27% overall; 38% of non-White vs. 25% of White respondents).

Forty-three respondents (26%) chose 'other' for this response. Of those 43 that chose 'other', 22 learned of DSVS through work, such as working for the county, working as a volunteer, etc. (17% of White respondents, vs. 6% of Non-White respondents), and 9 learned through some type of event.

Top 4 Ways People Learn of DSVS
January-February 2020, n=167
35% Fairfax County website
29% World of mouth
27% Training or presentation
26% Other

5The sample size for non-White respondents is low (n=32). More data would validate if this is a true disproportionality.

How did you learn about Fairfax County Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS)? graph


Which of the services offered by Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS) do you know about? Check all that apply.
Nearly 80% of respondents who answered the question on which services they knew about (n=153), reported that they knew about the DSVS hotline. This was followed closely by those who reported they knew about counseling for victims (74%).

Top 6 Services That People Were Aware Of
January-February 2020, n=153
78% DSVS Hotline
74% Counseling for Victims
54% Emergency Shelter
51% Counseling for Children
48% Advocacy Services
43% Services for Domestic Violence

Top 6 Services That People Were Aware Of graph


Would you use or recommend services through Fairfax County's Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS)?
Of the 153 respondents who stated in the preceding question which services they knew about, 152 selected whether or not they would actually recommend the services that Fairfax County DSVS provides. The vast majority (86%) stated that they would use or recommend DSVS services. 94% of Non-White6 respondents said yes, compared to 84% of White respondents. 

6 The sample size for non-White respondents is low (n=32). More data would validate if this is a true disproportionality.

Those Who Would Use or Recommend DSVS Services
January-February 2020, n=152
86% Yes
12% Don't know/Unsure
2% No

Those Who Would Use or Recommend DSVS Services graph


Why would you use or recommend Fairfax County's Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS)? Check all that apply.
When asked a follow up question as to reasons why they would use or recommend DSVS services, 137 (90%) of the 152 from the last question chose one or more reasons in response. Exactly three quarters of those who responded to this question selected ‘Most Services Being Free’ as a reason for doing so. Nearly two thirds (64%) selected ‘A Variety of Services’ and just over half (55%) selected ‘Expertise of Staff’ as reasons they would use or recommend DSVS Services. Only 50% of non-White7 respondents identified ‘Expertise of Staff’ as a reason that they would recommend DSVS services, compare this to 63% of White respondents who selected the same reason. 

7 The sample size for non-White respondents is low (n=30). More data would validate if this is a true disproportionality.

Reasons for Using or Recommending DSVS Services
January-February 2020, n=137
75% Most services being free.
64% Variety of services.
55% Expertise of staff.
42% Services are easy to access.

Other reasons listed for using or recommending DSVS services (7%):

  • Because they can support victims.
  • Compassionate, knowledgeable, dedicated staff.
  • Don’t really know.
  • Knowing the quality services Fairfax County provides in other areas, this has to be topflight. I have great respect for staff of all our Fairfax Human Services.
  • One of the few services available for this type of situation.
  • Responsiveness of staff. Effort made to ensure persons get what they need. Area for improvement: communications gap between FFX City police and DSVS.
  • Services are great, but provision is inconsistent.
  • Services are needed.
  • Shelter I saw was comfortable and clean.
  • Very limited option to address this matter but this one.

Reasons for Using or Recommending DSVS Services graph


Why would you not use or recommend Fairfax County's Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (DSVS) services? Check all that apply
Only 3 respondents (2%) answered previously that they would not use or recommend DSVS services, so in the chart below, we see their follow up responses on the reasons why they wouldn’t do so. Two of the three respondents indicated that they wouldn’t use or recommend DSVS services due to fear of the situation getting worse.

Count of Reasons for Not Using or Recommending DSVS Services
January-February 2020, n=3
2 Fear of situation getting worse.
1 Other: Waste of taxpayer money given the lack of resources.
1 Other: I didn't have a good experience with services provided.
1 Other: Fairfax County Police used the inspection team from having too many calls about a 21-year-old woman that was the problem.

Count of Reasons for Not Using or Recommending DSVS Services graph


Summary

The survey showed that DSVS’s clients are largely straight white females between the ages of 35 and 64 years old, slightly more than half of whom have been the victim of domestic or sexual violence themselves. The majority of victims received services by the police department or the courts with only 44% receiving services from DSVS. In fact, only 46% of respondents had ever heard of DSVS.  Of those who received services through DSVS, satisfaction was very high with 86% willing to recommend using this service to others, mostly due to the large variety of free services offered. Of those victims who did not get services in Fairfax County, lack of awareness of the services offered was the greatest obstacle, followed closely by fear that the situation would get worse.

There were some differences in responses by race, with nonwhite respondents being less likely to use the Women’s Center and being more likely to perceive that there were barriers to getting help. How non-whites learned about DSVS services differed from whites and they were more likely to recommended DSVS services.

However, these findings should be qualified due to the low percentage of non-whites who responded to the survey. And the lack of inclusion of surveys completed in any language other than English. Were this survey to be repeated, a more systemic effort should be made to ensure a representative sample of County residents are surveyed and those reposes are included in the analysis.

Download the PDF version of Fairfax County Department of Family Services The Path Forward Domestic and Sexual Violence Services Strategic Plan 2022-2025.*

*Fairfax County is committed to nondiscrimination on the basis of disability in all county programs, services and activities. To receive this information in an alternate format, call 703-324-5730 or TTY 711.

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